Sara asked in Consumer ElectronicsCameras · 2 months ago

What digital camera takes pictures like a disposable camera?

I love the look of pictures taken on disposable cameras, but I hate having to buy a new one all the time. I’m wondering if there is a camera that would take similar looking pictures that isn’t disposable?

8 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    Poor images can be had from any camera

    if the operator dosen't know enough about photography.

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  • 2 months ago

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  • 2 months ago

    You might find the right mode setting on your camera, but my advice would be to not use it!  The problem with using things like a "toy" setting is that you end up up with what the camera thinks the picture should look like rather than what you think.  Frank's made the excellent point that you need to understand what you find appealing - it's very unlikely that the camera will get it right!  I'd take the pictures using an automatic setting (or just use a point and shoot camera or phone camera) and then make the changes you want using an image editor.  Make sure you've got a copy of your original images and you can play to your heart's content!

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You can use any digital camera and use normally then copy the pictures taken to a computer and manipulate digitally to get the effect you want. Some digital cameras come with built-in presets that may get the same result. Look for a "Toy Camera" setting. This is particularly available in some low-end ("entry-level") Pentax dSLRs like the K-x and K-r.

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  • 2 months ago

    Excellent answer from "Frank". I will only add that you may find it, in the long run, easier and even cheaper to just keep using the disposable camera  if that is the look you want. Trying to duplicate that digitally can lead to lots... and I mean LOTS of time and work and practice and experimenting and software expense. Keep life simple for yourself and use the disposable film camera is my suggestion.

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  • Frank
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You first have to define and understand what are the specific aspects of an actual film photo that appeals to you.  Then, and only then, can you take any digital image and process it to look like a photo made from film.

    Some cameras have presets built in that mimic the color of film such as those from Fujifilm.  Usually these are mirrorless cameras and not the cheaper pocket cameras.

    Often one of the key giveaways that an image was made with film is the narrow dynamic range.  Today's digital cameras have a dynamic range (how wide of brightness range that a camera can record detail) anywhere from 10-15 stops.  Film, however, has a dynamic range of only about 5 stops.  Each stop is a doubling or halving of the brightness.  This means that the shadows be darker and the highlights will be much brighter often blown out without any detail.  You can mimic this by increasing the contrast, bringing down the brightness of shadows and increasing the brightness of the highlights or some combination.

    Grain is a key giveaway that the image was from a negative.  This is NOT to be confused with noise.  Noise is often described as digital grain, but it looks completely different than film grain.  There are apps that simulate grain such as Photoshop.

    Color of film can easily be simulated.  Kodak and Fujifilm both had unique color  palates that made it easy identify whether the image was with Kodak or Fuji film.  Kodak's film (for print film) had a higher saturation of reds and oranges, while Fujifilm's print film had higher saturation of blues and greens.

    Since color print, color slide and B&W all had unique looks, one first has to decide which film they want to emulate if indeed that want to actually simulate the real look of a particular film.  Otherwise, simply adjusting contrast and adding grain will be a good start and maybe good enough for some.

    All of these adjustments are best done on a laptop/desktop computer as opposed to a phone.  There may be apps that can tweak a digital image to look like film.  Do a search for film emulator, film simulator, Kodak film simulator and Fujifilm film simulator or something like this to find an app for your smartphone.

    For the best results use a laptop or desktop and then go onto YouTube and do a search for making digital photos look like film or something like that to find tutorials.  Once you have your settings for one image, you can save them as a preset to easily apply them to all of your images.

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  • 2 months ago

    Learn to use your smartphone.....

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  • 2 months ago

    Add a film grain filter from an image editing app

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