who invented the jazz guitar?? what musical style it originally played??

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  • Mike
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Photos of early jazz groups show musicians holding guitars and string basses, but those instruments could not be effectively recorded by the acoustic recording process. Banjos and tubas could be heard on acoustic records but were mostly limited to playing rhythm. With electric recording starting in 1925, guitars and string basses came into fashion as did crooners who replaced belters. Two early guitarists were Lonnie Johnson, who played a 12 string guitar in a blues style that supposedly influenced Robert Johnson, and Eddie Lang, who played anything that was put in front of him on a Gibson L4 and later an L5. They recorded a number of duets in the late 1920s which were unusual for that time in that Johnson was black and Lang was white. Their duets are available on youtube. Lang played with several blues singers but was most famous for the small group records he made with jazz violinist Joe Venuti which influenced Reinhardt and Grappelli.

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  • 2 months ago

    personally, i think that answer has been lost to time. eddie lang might be the first to record jazz guitar. but i'd guess it had been going on for a decade or more by that point. i think it probably started before charlie christian or django were even born, let alone les paul. i also think the style actually started on the banjo. maybe the answer is hiding somewhere in jelly rolls's library of congress interviews.

    if you mean who invented the hollow body archtop, read all about it:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archtop_guitar

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    • Mike
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      I didn't know the name Brock Mumford so I read the wiki article about him. It makes me think of Zoot Sims' description of Stan Getz: a nice bunch of guys.

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  • John
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
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  • 2 months ago

    I am not a guitarist, but I  believe that the first amplified electric guitar (legend???) was made by Les Paul.  Supposedly, he tapped the tonearm of a record player into the body on a guitar - and it was louder!!!!  From there, many developments, along with his singing wife Mary Ford.  Multitracking on first *wire* recording (gotta verify that . .) and then on tape.  Various effects - again, ask a guitarist.( I can tell you more than you ever want to know about FLUTES - but know when I am in a conversation above my pay grade.)  Now, you cannot call what Les and Mary di "jazz" - more like pop music with some improvisational influence out of country - but we all have to start someplace.  the biggest advocate of "taped" music was Bing Crosby - he invested $$$. That way, he could record several days of his radios shows in ONE day - and spend the rest of his time on the golf course.  Again - some of these stories are apocryphal - but I would regale my 7th and 8th grade general music classes with them, because sometimes a good story conveys a concept better than the dry truth.

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  • Speed
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The style of play? Probably Django Reinhardt, who played a Selmer, as Hernando mentioned.

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  • 2 months ago

    Some early 1960s jazz bands like Chicago and The Monkees.

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  • 2 months ago

    Are you asking about the guitar itself or the music genre? The most prominent early jazz guitar was the Selmer-Maccaferri, often just called a Selmer. It typically has a slotted headstock, steel strings, a tailpiece, and a non-circular soundhole. The music wasn't invented as much as simply evolved over time like all other music.

    Other guitars became known as jazz guitars, mainly the large body archtops made by Gibson long before the advent of electronic pickups. The Gibson L series was the start and some of them are still made, like the L-5 and the L-5 CES which was popularized by the late Wes Montgomery. The most prized archtops were made by John D'Angelico in his small shop on Kenmare Street in lower Manhattan, New York City.

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