Does "out of shape" alone include the meaning of "lack of exercise"?

If so, could you tell me how to use the phrase?

4 Answers

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  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    With respect to the human body, "out of shape" means to be in less than one's desired  physical condition.  "Lack of exercise" could be the cause, but it doesn't mean the same as "out of shape."

    We all have a vision of our ideal physical condition.  This would be "in shape".  There can be different standards.  If you're a runner, "in shape" would be the result of years of training.  A non-athletic person might consider themselves to be "in shape" if they aren't embarrassed to be seen in a bathing suit. Using those examples, the runner whose legs tire easily due to lack of exercise would be "out of shape."  The non-athletic person might consider themselves out of shape if they put on a few pounds from eating too much over the holidays.

  • 1 month ago

    Yes, it is implied that the person is not in good physical condition because they have not been exercising (enough or at all).  Exercise does not exactly mean working out though.  Lots of people do labor-intensive work that provides plenty of exercise and keeps them in shape.  They do not need to go work out at a gym or whatever.

  • RP
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    More than lack of exercise, out of shape means in poor condition (shape) and the reason for being in that poor condition could be one of many factors including dietary neglect, physical limitation, or lack of exercise. For example, I may look okay now, but I've been ill for a few months and I have trouble with some physical movements, as a result, but the reason is not my lack of exercise, but because I've been bed-ridden.

  • Mamie
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    "Out of shape" is a very general term that might (or might not) include the meaning of "lack of exercise."  

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