Was Frankenstein by Mary Shelley a work of feminist literature.?

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  • chorle
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You answer might be in this article "Feminism, Frakensein, and FreedomThe individualistic works and lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley " by Amy H. Sturgis (think I have heard some of it on her Looking Back on Science Fiction History feature in some StarShipSofa podcast 

    https://reason.com/2015/05/23/feminism-frankenstei...

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  • 2 months ago

    Read the book and decide for yourself.

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  • 2 months ago

    There's no women in it.

    • Tina
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Apart from Victor's mother, Elizabeth whom he marries, briefly, and Justine, the girl who gets the blame for the Monster's first murder...

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I wouldn't say that, but I would say that it's probably the greatest novel about motherhood ever as well as the first real modern science fiction novel, so it's tremendously impactful, influential and important. It's also a masterful book that's timeless and still holds up 200 years after it was written. I love it and think it's absolutely wonderful. I wrote my thesis on it so I could speak about it for days on end. It's one of the finest novels of all time and it's incredible how it can be enjoyed on so many different levels. It's an adventure story, it's a love story, it's got all the elements of a fable, it incorporates many of the characteristics of a fairy tale, it's sci-fi, it explores the concept of man versus monster - and which is which, duality, morality, man and his God, selflessness and courage versus selfishness and cowardice, how "civilisation" hasn't civilised society at all, and Shelley's exploration of how life is about the balance between finding peace of mind without losing passion for what defines us is just so astonishingly insightful. If I had a book one tenth that strikingly brilliant to my name I'd be overjoyed and bursting with pride. I don't use the word "genius" lightly. "Frankenstein" is pure genius. Before I got married I used to dream about being haunted by Mary Shelley's ghost. If she's reading this (the ghost, not the wife), come by any time. 

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  • C
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Not explicitly but there's definitely a critique of male blind spots regarding nurturing which very much later became one of the main preoccupations of 2nd wave feminism.  A leitmotif running through the book is the effects of Frankenstein's abrogation of parental care of the Creature.  He creates life but then does not nurture it and integrate it into society with disastrous consequences.  I'll leave it to you to find examples for your homework.

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  • Marli
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Well, her mother wrote The Vindication of the Rights of Women.

    Frankenstein is not generally considered a work of feminist literature. If you can find a feminist thread in the book, write an essay on it.

    • Tina
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Well, there is quite a bit, actually.

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  • 2 months ago

    Not really. The year 1816 is known as the Year Without a Summer because of severe climate abnormalities that caused average global temperatures to decrease by 0.4–0.7 °C (0.72–1.26 °F). In June 1816, "incessant rainfall" during that "wet, ungenial summer" forced Mary Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron and John William Polidori, and their friends to stay indoors at Villa Diodati overlooking Lake Geneva for much of their Swiss holiday. They decided to have a contest to see who could write the scariest story, leading Shelley to write Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus and Lord Byron to write "A Fragment", which Polidori later used as inspiration for The Vampyre – a precursor to Dracula. In addition, Lord Byron was inspired to write the poem "Darkness", by a single day when "the fowls all went to roost at noon and candles had to be lit as at midnight".

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  • Mark
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No, it is probably one of the first attempts at a sort of a science-fiction/horror story of the kind that Dean Koontz used to write.

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