Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentLaw & Ethics · 1 month ago

Current employer possibly blocking a new job opportunity?

I’ll try to keep it short. I’ve been at this company for one year. I didn’t like it from day one. I applied almost solely for the health insurance (stupid decision). My supervisor knows I’m unhappy because I made the mistake of believing I could trust a co-worker with this info. I’m not an outgoing person, my supervisor noticed that on week one. She said I’m hard to “read.” I replied, yeah it’s just my personality but it’s nothing personal. She’s lied trying to get people fired in the past. She has also told an employee “I do not like you or being around you.” This was to an employee that also does the job, yet doesn’t feel the need to be in a bouncy, happy-go-lucky mood every single day. She refuses to fill a full time slot to someone who offered to do it because she doesn’t like him. In fact, she just informed that employee that he will get full time hours but not actual full time... this way he suffers without the benefits. Those are a couple of examples. Fast forward I had an interview that went well, they said they would be calling my current employer. I’ve been told my attitude is poor, because I don’t constantly need to be the center of attention. I do my job, I’m just not the type to constantly care what people think. I also don’t kiss my supervisor’s butt like most. My supervisor is basically a bully with authority, manipulative, etc. I haven’t heard back from the possible new employer. Is there any way to find out if she is disgracing me for no reason? 

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  • 1 month ago

    If you are being 'disgraced', it is NOT for 'no reason'. If the supervisor doesn't like you, that's enough of a reason to state her opinion that you have a poor attitude when contacted by a potential employer. There's nothing you can do about it. You cannot stop someone from stating their opinion about you. You can take legal action if what they said is provably false, but you cannot prove or disprove what your attitude appears to be to others, that is for them to decide. There is no way to know what was given to the potential employer unless they elect to share that with you.

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  • John H
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Difficult to find out. Difficult to remedy. Consider this lesson learned for your next job when you get one.

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  • 1 month ago

    Your supervisor is within her rights to act the way she does and the company looks to her for her judgement (good, bad, or indifferent) so you are doing the right thing to look for work elsewhere. It might be necessary not to list that company as a previous employer.

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  • 1 month ago

    If the new employer declines employment, ask why.

    Normally, when your supervisor does not like you, you magically become the best employee they ever had when somewhere else calls. You know why? You leaving on your own is the easiest way to get rid of someone they don't like. So they talk you up, so the other guy wants you.

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  • 1 month ago

    You have a high opinion of yourself, but your supervisor would have a different story to tell, I'm pretty sure. What you don't realize is that you're all wrapped up in interpersonal details that don't play a role in your job. If you focus on your job, these issues will become a distant second.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    She is restricted legally in what she says when called by a potential new employer. I guess you could have a friend call her and act as if you are being considered for a job and see what is said. You walk a thin line doing that and of course if suspected you will be fired.

    No one wants to work day in and day out with a constant and daily sad sack so you can at least smile and be a bit friendlier in any job.

    Good luck with the new job

    "I didn’t like it from day one. "

    And so you went about finding daily reasons to not like the JOB, adjust the attitude just a tiny bit.

    • David S
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      She is not restricted legally in what she says. There are no laws regulating these communications. What happened was that corporations gradually began declining to comment to avoid potential lawsuits over negative comments.

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  • 1 month ago

    Sad but there's little you can do about it. Do you make sure the references you give give you good reviews.

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  • 1 month ago

    If she doesn't like you, why would she want to keep you at her company?

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