Why do I keep popping strings on my acoustic when taking tension off/on?

I had light strings but now I have regular strings I have a cheaper Martin.

6 Answers

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  • Emdog
    Lv 6
    4 weeks ago

    You mean a "ping" sound? I suggest going to auto parts store and getting some powdered graphite. String by string loosen, gently lift out of nut slot & put very very small amount in the slot, put string back in and tune. A tube should last you about 10 lifetimes.

     Don't know about impact of tuning and detuning on string life, but doing so will put some flex into the neck. As said elsewhere, not a good idea to do this on regular basis

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    you get what you paid for, what did you expect buying something cheap?

    if you want to play well, then you have to get the best....common sense tells you that

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  • 1 month ago

    In general strings do not like abrupt and repeated changes in tension other than those minor changes to keep the strings in tune. You did not explain exactly what you mean by "taking tension off/on." If you are going in and out of alternate tunings it's not uncommon to eventually break a string. I can't imagine what else you'd be referring to. PS Don't forget to abandon this question like everyone else does.

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  • Tony B
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Probably because you keep tightening and loosening the strings. Why are you doing that?

    Making the tiny adjustments necessary to keep the guitar in tune should be okay but if you are loosening and re-tightening strings frequently then they will break far sooner. This is most likely to happen at the tuners or at the bridge.

    I can't see there being anything sharp at the bridge of an acoustic guitar  although there could be at the barrel of the tuner. This would only affect that one string though.

    Having a tuner set to a different tuning standard (higher that A = 144) wouldn't be the cause - a few cents either way wouldn't matter and you don't say it happens when you are tuning up to the note.

    Added, as TommyMc says, tuning an octave higher is an easy “beginner mistake” and would certainly break strings but you say you've used the same tuner on other guitars so I assume you know how to use it. Also, that wouldn't explain the broken strings when you reduce tension.

    • Tommymc
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      A couple of hertz doesn't matter, however, trusting a tuner without verifying with a reference note could result in tuning an octave high....or breaking a string trying to get there.  BTW, on my pedal steel, I tune a .011 to G# above high E, and a pedal pulls it up to A. Now that's high!

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  • 1 month ago

    Why do you keep pooping strings? You should see a doctor

  • GA41
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    I wounder if you are using a tuner which is set to the right frequency. You may be over tightening the strings. I think the setting on the turner should be 440 HZ. If this is not the problem, I would check to see if the strings are popping the same string in the same place. You may have a sharp edge on the bridge or the nut which is cutting into the string. Also, make absolutely certain you are not crimping the string before installation. Crimping the string will make it brittle in the area it is crimped.

    • Jeremiah1 month agoReport

      I use guitar tuna it’s an app. Perhaps I will use my actual tuner, thanks! I’ve used it on other guitars and never had a problem though 

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