What kind of wire magnetically floats?

Details: I know coil can float with a current flowing through it, but I want to know what kind of wire can float (over a magnet) as is (without any currents or anything added). 

If the wire must be magnetized, that is acceptable.

Context:  I'm trying to make a project where I can bend wires into shape then add cotton to it and make it float... aka a floating cloud. Obviously, the components that I use to make this floating cloud may change because I still have no clue what kind of wire I can use that floats magnetically and is also able to bend the way I want it to.

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  • 1 month ago

    Only a magnet (permanent or electromagnet) can "float" over other magnets - but even that setup tends to be very unstable, with the suspended magnet trying to "fall off" the field of the support magnets.

    Magnetic suspension devices are generally active, with a powered coil attracting the suspended item and a sensor of some sort monitoring the suspension height & controlling the power to the lifting coil.

    Edit - either buy something like this, that can levitate the wire or metal in your "cloud" - https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/8-Maglev-Floating-Globe...

    Or you can build a similar gadget yourself:

    https://www.designnews.com/gadget-freak/how-build-...

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  • 1 month ago

    A wire carrying a current will float because it has a magnetic field around it.

    You can make a coil with a tiny hearing aid battery supplying a current.  Include a high resistor to cut down the current and make the battery last longer.

    • Thanks, but is there a wire that can float with no current flowing through it at all or is that impossible (for all intents and purposes)? 

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Search for "diamagnetic" materials. There's no guarantee they'll float though. Bismuth, antimony, copper, gold, quartz are examples. Your best bet would be copper wire. I honestly don't think it's going to work how you're thinking though.

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