Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 1 month ago

Is it okay to have mainly male characters in my novel?

So I’m writing a book and I have four main characters; all of them are male. Earlier there was a female protagonist, but I eventually realized she didn’t add much to the plot, so I changing up the story a bit. She now plays a big role, but isn’t introduced until later on in the story. Even though that feels like a right move, now I can’t help but feel like I need to add another female character. Sure, there’s the mothers and sisters in the story, but there’s not much women as a whole, I guess? I’ve thought about writing one of the protagonists as female instead, but I’ve been working on this story for so long that it just doesn’t seem right? I’ve really gotten to know all of my characters and switching their gender all of the sudden doesn’t work for me. And there’s just not enough room in the plot to add a whole other person into it. So should I keep the characters I have, or try adding another female somehow?

I just feel kinda guilty even though I’m a female myself haha. Keep in mind that I have written my female character very carefully and made her as human as possible. She’s actually one of my favorite OCs which is why I couldn’t get rid of her.

6 Answers

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  • Logan
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    It's your story, do what you want. Another story you write may have an entirely female cast with not a single male in the entire story. It's just one story.

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  • Marli
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If a new character or a "gender reassigned" character does not feel right, then don't use her.

    One of my favourite old time movies is "The Women".  It's dated with 1930s stereotyping (wronged wife, vixen [Joan Crawford. Great job.] catty society friends, wise mother, eavesdropping servants, etc.] but all the characters are women. Not a man in sight.  They talk about men: getting, keeping or losing husbands.  I'm sure your men will mention women.

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  • 1 month ago

    Put in the characters that best tell the story. Gender doesn't matter.

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  • Amber
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    Just focus on creating something people wont to read, that's hard enough, and try to forget all the noise in the background. Tell the story that needs to be told and how you see it. I can think of a few movies with an entire male cast, and I dislike it when a female is shoe-horned in just to appease the femi-nazi's of the world. 

    I'd rather see one good female character, then five weak ones.

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    • Amber
      Lv 5
      1 month agoReport

      Since you get all kinds of women you get all kinds of female characters. But there are women in this world who want females depicted as super-human and scream for equality that's not really equality. They want strong, kick *** women all the time - not all women are like that. It's false. 

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  • 1 month ago

    It rather depends what the novel is about. A story about life in the trenches in WW2 would be fine to have mainly male characters where as Little Women would not.

    • Tina
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      The trenches of WW2? "Nobody told them..."

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    How many books have you read this year? As 2019 draws to a close, you ought to devote a few moments of reflection to what you've managed to read over the course of the last 12 months. If you're writing a novel, it only stands to reason that you ought to have read a few in your lifetime, but if you're working on a novel right now, then you ought to have put away a fair number of novels recently so as to put yourself into a better position for crafting your own. So what number are we looking at then? Are we going for the low end perhaps, say 1 a month, for a total of 12 over the course of the entire year? 

    Well, I must say, if I were looking to design a house I think it only stands to reason that I'd go out of my way to study the designs of at least a few dozen homes. Wouldn't you say that it's only logical that a person claiming to be writing a novel would be the type of person, or rather OUGHT TO BE the type of person who reads a fair number of novels? 

    I stress this because only a person who reads very little would be compelled to ask whether or not it might be acceptable to include only a scant few characters of either gender. There are no established rules for that sort of thing, and it's silly to think that there might be. And if you're under the mistaken impression that readers might take umbrage to such a thing, you must be forgetting that to be in a position to make such an observation, they'd first have to actually read the novel. And if it's not well-written, engaging and interesting, they won't care to slog through to the end to be able to make comments on whether or not they thought you included a number of female characters that meets their bare minimal standards. 

    Characters exist to further the plot. They are devised to fit the story. They are created for the sole purpose of inhabiting the created universe the author crafts. An author who thinks "Hmmm, maybe I ought to throw a few more female characters into this story, you know, just to satisfy those readers who are real sticklers for that sort of thing" are not writers that read often, and they're not authors who read good books. 

    Concentrate on writing something that's worth reading. Then worry about what people might think about it. And if you're not capable of writing something worth reading yet, then read some good books and gain some insight into what makes something worth reading. How are these observations not completely obvious facts to an aspiring writer? 

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