Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 2 months ago

Which was more important, American revolutionary war or war of 1812?

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    The Revolutionary war of course.

    • sydney19
      Lv 4
      2 months agoReport

      he French beat the British at Yorktown and gave the Victory to the Americans

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  • 1 month ago

    I wish the south won and black people continue to be slaves forever and beaten up because black people are pure evil then deal with gay people mediteranean people and rich people but make peace with Asian people and white people and sexy ladies and north/south native Americans.

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  • Who
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

     the war of 1812 -

    cos the russians kicked the sh//t out of napoleon so his army was never the same afterwards.

     This led to his defeat in 1815

    without that defeat its likely all europe would have become french (so no WW1 or WW2)

    (you MUST be more precise in your questions

    As far as the world was concerned both the US revolutionary was and war of 1812 were irrelevant)

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  • Cousin
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    The War of 1812. The revolution was a fluke and should never have occurred;however, having occurred, they needed to back it up. Those bastards get sent to boarding school where eight year olds listen to the SCREAMS of other eight year olds getting their bottoms soundly birched. There was never a shortcut out of the British Empire. It would have evolved much faster with America and India IN it. Remember Eric Blair aka George Orwell shot that poor, sweet, innocent elephant which had only broken its chains and was finding a few gentle moments of relief, at long last, playing in some dirt and twigs, simply not to look the Fool. Well . . . 

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  • 2 months ago

    The American Revolutionary War, without which it's unlikely that there would have been a War of 1812.

    • Killmouseky
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Not merely "unlikely", but definitely not.  

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    American Revolutionary War, it changed the future of North America and the world. The War of 1812 ended in a draw, it changed nothing.

    comment: The War of 1812 was a draw, it ended in what was called "status quo ante bellum", Latin for "the state existing before the war." Neither the US or Britain gained or lost territory.

     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Status_quo_ante_bell...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Ghent

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    • Killmouseky
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      The War of 1812 was a wholesale defeat for the U.S.  It wouldn't have been able to finance an 1815 campaign.  The war was NOT a "draw."  U.S. was lucky that the U.K. agreed to very mild terms.      

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  • 2 months ago

    the revolutionary war the French won that for the USA at Yorktown

    the USA Lost the war of 1812 USA wanted to annex Canada and Failed

    the UK wanted to save Canada Objective achieved the UK and Canada won remember the USA started the war

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The aims and the scope of each of those were and are drastically different. The American Revolutionary War was waged to gain America's independence from Great Britain. This goal was achieved and the creation of the United States of America would come to have a profound effect on the rest of the world and the new nation would rise to become the richest, most powerful, and most influential country that has ever existed. 

    The War of 1812 was essentially a spat that expanded into a war, but neither of the belligerents were really and truly interested or invested in engaging in total war with one another. Because the war is considered a minor conflict by world standards, it's not a war that merits a great deal of attention. Suffice it to say that the Americans were seeking an opportunity to step out of Britain's shadow and demonstrate that they were a full-fledged nation ready, willing and able to stand up for their own interests and that they weren't going to tolerate acts that defied that sovereignty and the British were looking to guarantee the safety and stability of their overseas interests in North America and were willing to go to war to show the Americans that while they may have been independent, they weren't going to be perceived as equals anytime soon.

    Barely 30 years after the final battle of the American Revolution took place, the War of 1812 broke out. The Americans were still a ragtag army of undisciplined citizen soldiers, but despite the large British advantages of superior numbers, equipment and tactics, the Americans managed to hold their own despite losing practically all of the major battles of the war. Their greatest victory - and quite an impressive one at that, occurred after the official end of the fighting had been declared, but troops in the field had simply not received word as of yet. 

    The British managed to protect their colonies and the people who lived there, but the Americans succeeded in guaranteeing that the British would cease impressment of their sailors. Whether or not the actual fighting was what convinced the British to come to that agreement or whether the fighting in Europe had subsided to a degree that it was no longer necessary to engage in such a policy is of course a matter of debate, but the conflict also led to a permanent agreement between Britain and the United States regarding the border in the far north in what would later come to be the State of Maine, something that would spur the Americans to be more aggressive and tenacious when it came time to negotiate the border in the Pacific Northwest where the British were again willing to offer favorable terms and adopted a policy of proceeding with both parties on an equal footing. 

    I think any military historian would concede that the British and their Canadian allies achieved far better results, but considering that the Americans were up against a much more powerful opponent whose training far exceeded their own and who were fielding much better equipment and had a much larger fleet, it must certainly be noted that the Americans didn't do all that badly. And if we're talking about the long-term and lasting effects of the war, it was a terrible loss for Britain because it marked the end of the era of the British duping themselves into believing that they were still a major player in North America. The end result was that the United States managed to convince the world that the American Revolution had not been a fluke and that despite being undisciplined and untrained and unrefined, the Americans were willing to fight for what they believed in, no matter the odds, and that alone gained them respect and credibility that would serve them well in the future. Had the United States not managed to hold her own, it's quite possible that the British might have attempted to influence the outcome of the American Civil War 46 years later. The fact that they were well aware that the US would never accept that kind of insult gave them pause and the US became the unquestioned power in the region. 

    Obviously the American Revolution had a greater impact across the world because had things gone differently, it would have had a drastic effect on humanity. Had the War of 1812 been a win for the British, they likely would have gained some concessions from the Americans, but it's doubtful that they would have been willing to dedicate the time, effort, money, men and materiel to attempting to subjugate the Americans and bring them back under the yoke. Had they attempted something that severely stupid and misguided, they'd have suffered sorely for it. And had the Americans won, it's likely that they would have agreed to make concessions to Britain and relinquish at least some of the territorial gains they'd made, possibly all of them. But in the end, either way, the balance of power would have remained essentially the same. 

    But if the American Revolution had failed, the British likely would have tried and executed some of the greatest thinkers of that or any other era. And today, we would be at a loss to have someone to look toward in dealing with the threats we've faced. For all its flaws and ills, the USA has stood at the forefront of the white, Christian world for over a hundred years and thrown in its lot with old friends and sworn enemies alike in an effort to preserve the way of life that shaped it. 

    If you're not an American, a Briton or a Canadian, then chances are you couldn't give a toss about the War of 1812. But we all had a stake in the American Revolution, even if we wouldn't be born for 245 years after the first shot was fired.   

  • 2 months ago

    The first one is always important. It give people a feeling of success.

    The second PROVED we could beat Great Britain again and it wasn't a fluke.

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    • Killmouseky
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      But the U.S. had it's dumb a$$ handed to it on a platter in the War of 1812, & was virtually bankrupted by the war.   

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