Does this sound like a fuel pump and/or spark plug issue on my son’s Chrysler Sebring?

My 19 year old son has a 2001 Chrysler Sebring LXi convertible that he bought in June of 2017 for $2,000 dollars. It’s got about 110K on the odometer. Since we bought it, we’ve probably spent close to $4,500 dollars fixing various problems like the power windows, struts, water pump, and different engine sensors. It’s always been a “slow starter,” even after replacing the starter motor and battery. In the past six days, before it warms up, we have to floor the gas pedal to get it to start and it sputters and stalls. When stopping at a red light, it just dies. Then it’s much harder to start and keep running. It very much seems like it’s out of gas, even when the tank is ¾ full.

But there is no check engine light and once the car warms up, it runs smooth and beautifully – including normal acceleration when punching the gas pedal. In other words (and I’ve tested this several times), if we let it idle for at least 12 minutes in our driveway, you wouldn’t even notice it has an engine stalling problem.

What might be causing these problems?

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12 Answers

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  • zipper
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Sounds like the carburetor needs adjusting if it has one, if it is fuel injection it needs flue system cleaner.  And A tune up by someone that knows what they are doing. The Chrysler can be touch. But that engine has lots of miles left in it so it is worth the trouble.

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  • J
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Head gaskets and or clogged injectors and dirty fuel system.

    Warms up and everything gets tight and opens up.

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  • 1 month ago

    Usually a fuel delivery problem. Start with replacing fuel filter and if that does not cure it do a pressure check on the fuel pump.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Clean the idle air control valve or just replace it.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFhoNykgQtc

    Youtube thumbnail

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  • 1 month ago

    It might be a really clogged Catalytic converter.  Needed to change mine on my 2001 Impala earlier this year.  There is no check engine light for this.

    It might be a bad EGR valve, too.

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  • Dan
    Lv 4
    1 month ago

    Carefully check the hose between the throttle body and mass airflow sensor. If the clamps are loose or the hose has a crack it will cause the exact problem you're having. Sometimes this hose will have a smaller hose teed into it for the PCV system. Oil change boys will disconnect it sometimes when they check or change the air filter, make sure all hoses are plugged in.

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  • g
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The 2001 Chrysler Sebring LXi was an absolute dog.  Extremely poor quality and very unreliable. 

    Ditch it now and don't look back.  It's a money pit.  

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  • 1 month ago

    I suggest finding a forum that deals with this particular car. They are according to Consumers Reports the one car to avoid buying used for every model year produced as long as they were new enough to make the Buyers Guide.

    My guess is that a temperature sensor is not working right. This could be in the intake system or on the block.

    There is the chance that the injectors need a systems cleaner run through it or that the fuel pressure regulator is not working right.

    Because the engine is a Mitsubishi engine look at the eclipse forums for solutions. One other resort is safecar.gov which has service bulletins on file there.

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  • 1 month ago

    If that car has the 2.7 liter motor sell it immediately before the timing chain jumps.

    Source(s): Mitsubishi Master Tech
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  • The cold running setting on the carburettor/fuel injector needs adjustment.  A mobile "tune-up" man should be able to sort it cheaply.

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