Collecting "Disability", But can still physically work?

If someone is collecting Disability Benefits, but still being able to go to work seems wrong.  If you are truly "Disabled", then you shouldn't be able to work and receive SSD Benefits.  It seems quite unfair.  If you can keep a job, you shouldn't be allowed to also collect SSD. Its like pick one.  I am visually Impaired, and no employer will give me a chance.  I would much rather work than not.  

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  • reme_1
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You might go through American DIsabilities Act and see if they have an agency to help people with disabilities find work.

    ALso google people with disabilities looking for work---- don't know if they are legit but it's a place to start. Also check with employment office and see if they can help. My best

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  • 1 month ago

    You seem very judgmental and hateful.

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  • 1 month ago

    huh?  some people have mental disabilities.  when you see me, I look like I could work, but I can only function about 2 hours per day.  after doctors appointments, food shopping, and other needs, work isn't much of a possibility.

    it is SUPPOSED to be that if a person can work and earn at least 1220/month that they don't get SSDI or SSI, but many lie and exaggerate on the application.

    If you can only work part time, you should still be eligible for assistance.

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  • Judith
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Many people work who collect social security disability benefits because they aren't gainfully employed - or they can't maintain jobs for any length of time.  That doesn't make them any less disabled.  

    The definition of disability for adults by social security (assuming that's what you are talking about) is that a person cannot be gainfully employed for at least 12 months due to their disabling condition.  Gainful employment is defined as earnings of $1220 a month in 2019 and $1260 a month in 2020.

    You seem to think that only those with physical impairments qualify and that those with mental problems don't.  That isn't the case and, with your way of thinking, many many people with mental impairments would be up a creek without a paddle and would be seriously struggling because they are unable to keep their jobs due to their condition and have nothing to fall back on.

    Social Security also doesn't penalize people who attempt employment but are unsuccessful.  If a person stops working within 3 months due to their condition and it is verified with their employer, it can be written off as an unsuccessful work attempt.  Sometimes it can be written off if it lasts 4 to 6 months but that is very rare.  The point of this is so that people who think they might be better can try working without fearing the loss of their benefits.  The same rationale applies to the 9 month trial work period which is available to those who get social security benefits (the trial work period doesn't apply to those who get SSI).  It gives them plenty of time to see if they can hold a job without fearing the loss of benefits as well.  If they are gainfully employed then, good for them, and benefits will eventually be terminated.

    SSI is different.  Half of what a person earns over $85 a month will reduce their SSI benefit.

    I hate to say this, but you have the type of attitude which makes it difficult for people with mental impairments who are always feeling judged by people with physical impairments or people who are lucky enough to be mentally and physically healthy.  Try to be more understanding and compassionate.

    I was a SS claims rep for 32 yrs.

    • Pricilla
      Lv 4
      1 month agoReport

      Well said Judith.

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  • 1 month ago

    It is "wrong".  However I can see why people do it. If you're not qualified for anything beyond entry level work (or thereabouts) then why bother going to a job and working 35-45 hours a week that's not going to provide you with a lifestyle that's substantially better than being on disability. There's no incentive to get a job. 

    When the economy tanked about a decade ago. The number of disability claims went up fairly dramatically. Between 2008 and 2010, the number or claims went up by 25% in 3 years. Note : These are people who attempted to claim disability benefits, not all of them were approved obviously. 

    https://www.ssa.gov/oact/STATS/dibGraphs.html

    https://www.ssa.gov/oact/STATS/dibStat.html

    The reason for this was most likely that there were/are plenty of people who probably have some manner of disability, but were able to find and maintain a job. When those same people lost their jobs, and couldn't find a comparable job with similar pay, instead of accepting a job with significantly lower pay, they just filed for disability benefits as the benefits would provide them with a similar lifestyle that a working two part time entry level jobs would . Once the economy rebounded (early-mid 2010's) and better jobs became available again. The number of people on disability benefits started trending back down again. Did these people's disabilities magically go away? No.What happened was that they were able to find jobs that provided a noticeably better income than being on disability benefits did. There may be other factors that I'm overlooking, but that's the gist of it. 

    There are programs that allow you work some hours and still keep your benefits with there being an earnings cap (once you go over a set amount per month, your benefits are reduced), and I'm sure there are people who make sure that they only work enough so that their benefits aren't reduced. Again, it's not exactly the most ethical thing in the world, but it's not illegal and I can see why people do it.

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  • I deleted my last answer. 

    I worked for 10 years part-time at a job I loved with no benefits. I made just a few dollars more than what was allowed to collect benefits. At the time I thought this was OK, the costs of my medical care were kept low because I just ignored them. What I discovered later was that they were all much worse for having ignored them for so long. 

    Looking back, I wish I had made a little less, so I could have gotten Medicaid. I can't imagine not having worked, but I could have asked to be paid less (it was a reasonably well paying career).  Had I done that I would have gotten better medical care and would be farr less disabled than I am now.  In the end the cost to the taxpayers is higher over my lifetime. I now have very costly medical expenses tnat could have been avoided.

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  • Laurie
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If you are collecting disability THROUGH SOCIAL SECURITY...

    Every state participates in the “Ticket to Work” program that enables disabled individuals to transition into working, at least part time, without immediately losing disability benefits.

    Read about the program (Source, below), and/or call the Ticket to Work hotline (866-968-7842) to ask where to go for guidance.

    • Judith
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Ticket to Work is federal and a Social Security program - not a state program - although people can meet the requirements of it via Vocational Rehab which happens to be State.  If someone is gainfully employed the earnings tests; e.g. gainful employment still applies.

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  • Chiaro
    Lv 5
    1 month ago

    There are ways to get paid for typing the words from a recording online. Transcribing. It's not a lot of money, with the right company you might make 10 an hour for a while and then maybe up to 20. But if you are truly out of options you might want to look into it. I feel there must be jobs out there for visually impaired people. https://www.afb.org/research-and-initiatives/emplo... There. Read everything on this website. Or have your screen reader read it to you. Or a friend read it to you. Do you not have even one single friend who can help you get in touch with the American Foundation for the Blind? What is wrong with this country? Call this number (212) 502-7600

    • Right,it's not alot of money & people who are Blind have far more expenses than most. I'm not Blind, but I'm severely vision impaired. So many things people take for granted aren't easily available to people w/ vision impairments.With technology things are getting easier.It's expensive to be Blind. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Totally agree. I think people who can't work shouldn't be collecting SS. So many abuse the system that eventually the social welfare system will go bankrupt.

    • Judith
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Social Security isn't a welfare program; SSI (supplemental security income) however, is.

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  • 1 month ago

    You can only earn a certain amount after which you will start losing your disability income.

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