Bre asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 2 months ago

How can you romanticize extrovert characters ?

Hello I’m a teenage writers who’s been having a difficult time in my character developments , I’ve written a bunch of scripts of all genres and themes but lately ive really been wanting to write a romance where the girl is extrovert and the guy is introvert . It’s really uncommon in movies. It’s generally really hard to romanticize extrovert female characters. Especially with most movies female love interests being centered around a quiet girl because mystery attracts the audience . Any tips ? is there any trick I can use to engage the audience and have them root for the relationship as much as they would in movies where there’s the vice versa .

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You are attempting to make the claim that only shy, reserved, introverted women can be romantized, and that's just a ridiculous claim to make. There are plenty of outgoing, gregarious, extroverted female characters in books and in films. It's not uncommon at all. The fact that you disagree shows that you are not well read and have not been exposed to a sizable number of good films. Just because your limited observations have led you to this misguided opinion, that doesn't mean it ought to hold any weight with anybody else. There are heaps upon heaps of strong female characters in literature and in films who don't fit the mould you say most do. There are all sorts of things that come into play when we talk about what might make a character likable or appealing. Instead of asking for an arbitrary list of random ways different writers go about it, why not just read 100 more books, see that the opinion that you've formed is wholly incorrect and observe how good writers bring their characters to life? If you haven't read a good number of well written stories and watched a good number of excellent films, you can't possibly hope to craft a decent story or screenplay. 

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  • Marli
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The extrovert girl is usually the girl who weds the shy guy, so she shouldn't be hard to write.  She is curious about this quiet man, and she is not afraid to sit beside him, ask him about himself, give her opinions, ask for his and tease him out of his silence.  One answerer said "Elizabeth Bennet from Pride and Prejudice".  Just the girl, and the modern Elizabeth does not need to wait for the man to initiate the meeting.

    What if the girl initially wants to be friends.  Americans are known to be friendly and outgoing.  They have many Facebook friends. They are ready to speak their minds. They wears bold colours. (Yes, I am stereotyping.  Every American is not friendly or bold; but that's how the introverted English saw them in Victorian days... and might still see them.) She is attracted to the shy guy, so she attempts to crack his shell, or melt the ice off him, to see what he is like inside.  He flinches away from the cracking operation, but likes the warm feeling from the melting operation.  So they gradually learn about each other. There are misunderstandings and hurt feelings.  They have an outward goal (battling Voldemort. I saw Hermione as a Lizzie Bennet speaks her mind type) and through achieving it, their respect and liking deepen into love.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    I think your main problem is boxing characters into a "type". Because no one is introvert and no one is extrovert. We are all a mixture of both. 

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  • 2 months ago

    I'm not sure what you mean. A lot of the couples I know are extroverted women and introverted men. That seems to work better than the opposite situation. But I can't really think of examples in the movies- except for Pride and Prejudice. She was clearly an extrovert and he was an introvert. In Frozen, Anna is an extrovert and Elsa is an introvert, but Elsa doesn't have a love interest. 

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