What are the problems in this text, how might the historical context of this prayer explain those problems...? ?

The following is the literal text of the kol nidre: “All vows, bonds, devotions, promises, obligations, penalties and oaths, wherewith we have vowed, sworn, devoted, and bound ourselves, from this Day of Atonement to the next Day of Atonement--may it come to us for good--all of these we release ourselves from them. They shall be absolved, released, annulled, made void and of no effect; they shall not be binding nor shall they have any power. Our vows shall not be vows; our bonds shall not be bonds; and our oaths shall not be oaths.” What are the problems in this text, how might the historical context of this prayer explain those problems, and how might this text reflect the fragility of human vows, promises and commitments?

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    One really needs the historical context to make sense of this and to understand why it was/is important to disavow forced oaths, vows, promises, and similar commitment. To get the historical context, look for information on the Spanish Inquisition from 1492. One aspect of this was a choice between death or a forced conversion to a religion other than one's own religion, as well as the only way to avoid these choices being exile.

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  • 2 months ago

    (Note: "we release ourselves from them" is a mistranslation. It should

    be "we regret them." The root word of "icharatna" is "charatah," regret.)

    I suggest you get your hands on a copy of ArtScroll's Yom Kippur "Machzor"

    (N. Scherman) and read the first 2 pages of the commentary before Kol Nidrei.

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  • 2 months ago

    This is your homework, buddy, not ours.

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