Is this sentence grammatical and does it capture the things I have questions about?

"What shall happen after the probationary period in relation to, including, but not limited to company's benefit?"

I am writing to the HR of the place I will be working for. I am mostly concerned about whether I will get benefit as a permanent staff would get and also would like to know about other unmentioned things that entails (salary raise etc.)

Does the question capture what I'm concerned about (company's benefit, salary raise, and other things that might/could have happened after probationary period?

Or how would you word the question? Thank you!

3 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    No speaker of American English has used "shall" in the last 15 years except in joking or legal language. The Brits use it more, but it's dying out there, too. 

    phrases like "in relation to, including but not limited to" are legal talk, reserved for contracts.  Just ask your question. 

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  • 2 months ago

    No, it definitely doesn't. I couldn't tell what you were trying to ask until I read your explanation. Keep it simple. 'Will I get benefits after the probationary period and, if so, what are they?' Would I automatically get a raise after a certain amount of time at this job?'

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  • 2 months ago

    Dear god no.  Don't try and sound pompous, just ask the question. "Could you please tell me what benefits I'll be entitled to after the probation period".

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