Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsMedicine · 2 months ago

IV set and drop infusion rate?

So my question is not about the math part but the fundamentals,

so I have this vitamin c medication that I need to deliver at a 1 gram per minute,

1) do IV sets have a volume control on them to set how many ml per minute to flow from the tube?

2) if I have an IV set with this description 20 drops/mL, I don t even know what exactly that is refering to, it take 20 drops for one milliliter to be extracted?? so what about the timing?

3)let s say your whole sterile pouch including Vitaminc C(75g=150cc) and MgCL2(2CC) is 750CC, and you are using a set that says on it 20drops/ml, what should you do to deliver 1 grams of Vitamin C per minute to the patient?

Update:

thanks a lot got it

1)it's a work of an eye and a timer

even after you plug it to the arm it will go down with the same rate?

2)I know for an IV we need a Container, IV set, and Catheter

there is another component idk what it's called, extension

from what I red on post number 2 here it's not recommended , specially for single infusions

https://iv-therapy.net/topic/iv-tubing-connected-d...

2 Answers

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  • Ash
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    1) Yes, there is a control on IV set but it is not called " volume control" ....LOL !!

    It is an adjustable "clamp" that basically lets you squeeze the IV tubing to control the flow of medication through the bag. The clamp is adjusted to let you control number of drops falling through the drip chamber. For that particular IV set few drops of medication contains approximately 1 mL of medication. That drops are mentioned on the set. A macro set can specify about 5 or 0 or 15 drops for 1 mL, while a micro set can be almost 45 or 60 drops for 1 mL .

    2) If you have a IV set with 20 drops/mL, then it means to deliver 1mL of medication you will need to set 20 drops. Timing is recommended by the doctor. Lets say the patient is required to have  1 mL in 1 minute then you will have to set 20 drops in 1 minute ( or 1 drop per 3 seconds). However, if you are requested to give 6 mL in 1 minute then you need to set 20x6 = 120 drops in 1 minute ( or 2 drops per second)

    3) First find out how much mL of Vitamin C you need to give

    75g = 150cc

    then 1g = 150/75 = 2 cc or 2mL

    Now the set mentions 20 drops/mL, so for 2mL we will need to give 20x2 = 40 drops

    The timing requested is 1 minute, so you need to adjust 40 drops in 1 minute.

    Now you will not wait for 1 minute to count 40 drops, so you find simpler ratio.

    40 drops in 60 s means 2 drops in 3 sec. Just to be more accurate, maybe you will wait for say 9 s and check if you get 6 drops.

     I hope this helps you understand the concept.

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    • Lord Arthas2 months agoReport

      2)I know for an IV we need a Container, IV set, and Catheter
      there is another component idk what it's called, extension
      from what I red on post number 2 here it's not recommended , specially for single infusions
      https://iv-therapy.net/topic/iv-tubing-connected-directly-iv-catheter

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    1. Yes

    2. < 20 drops for one milliliter to be extracted >  Exactly.  So if you had to administer 1 mL/min, the drip rate is 20 drops / min.

      

    3. 75 g / 150 cc * 1 cc/mL = 0.5 g/mL.  Since the desired rate is 1 g / min you need to administer (1 g/min) / (0.5 g/mL) = 2 mL/min.  At 20 drops/mL, you want to flow 2 ml/min * 20 drops/mL = 40 drops/min

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