How could hitler's actions be justified on utilitarian grounds?

I am doing a research paper on why utilitarianism does not achieve the betterment of society, and im writing a point on how we've seen a utilitarian mindset in history's worst events

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  • 1 month ago

    Hitler was trying to eradicate the corruption in the world and had to build an army to combat the evil globalist empire that had taken over the world and was destroying Germany on behalf of England. So what Hitler did (there as no holocaust) was utilitarian in that it was a necessary action that evolution had to take to continue to evolve, because, as it is now, evolution had stopped, and that cannot stay in that state for long without there being upheavals. Hitler was a conscious upheaval rather than an unconscious one from nature.

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  • 2 months ago

    To some degree, yes.  If lynching someone for a rape they did not commit keeps a town peaceful, then by the utilitarian logic proceed with the lynching. 

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  • 2 months ago

    After he improved the economy in Germany he destroyed Germany by dragging into a needless war.

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  • 2 months ago

    One must look at all situations through the eyes of God.

    Hitler's actions were wrong in the eyes of God.

    Hitler should have sought God, not turned from God.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    That's not a great example because the actions of the Nazi party only benefited a select group of people, not  the greatest number of people as should be the case according to classical utilitarianism. I suppose you might call it prejudiced, selective or limited utilitarianism. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Good theme for a paper. Although Hitler's ideas didn't quite fit model of utilitarian thinking. Utilitarianism is summed up as, "The greatest good for the greatest number of people," but Hitler was more interested in promoting the interests and increasing the prominence of only those groups of people he thought were superior.....which didn't include the greatest number of people. That's not to say that utilitarianism was good either. But Hitler just sucked in kind of a different way.

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