Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 2 months ago

Christians, if your God had ordered his followers to rape children would you make excuses for that too?

He commanded his followers to commit rape, genocide, infanticide, and condoned slavery and yet Christians will lie and make excuses for him along with pulling your contextual argument as if there is an context in which these things would be acceptable.  Is there anything your fictional God can do which is evil enough to cause you to doubt his righteousness?

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes we absolutely would

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  • Sara
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I doubt it. They've held on this long and they're capable of insane mental gymnastics.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    A person can battle rape and other sins of lust using the rosary and fasting. The Virgin Mary, known as the Immaculate Conception because she was conceived free from original sin, is the Model of Purity. Mary never sinned during her entire life and is a perpetual virgin.

  • 2 months ago

    They do whatever a giant, bearded man in the sky does.

    I personally find it depressing.

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  • 2 months ago

    God ordered rapists to be stoned to death so why would he order people to rape children? God also did not order genocide or infanticide and He did not condone slavery.

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  • 2 months ago

    You make a fair point. As I see it, we've got three choices:

    (1) Claim that if God commanded them, these things are good.

    (2) Give up the notion that God is always good.

    (3) Question the validity of the stories, which means giving up the notion that the Bible is magically perfect.

     

    My phrasing of those options probably indicates which choice I'm making. In my view, the Bible represents different, and evolving, views about God. Most of those particular stories--I kept a log of them when reading the whole Bible--were produced by one particular group of writers in one historical period, the "Deuteronomists" who produced the books known as Deuteronomy, Joshua, and Judges.

     

    Apparently, at that time their notion of God was as a patron of the Hebrews--a rising, powerful competitor of other nations' deities. Later (that is, developed by later writers), we find the identification of the Hebrew God with a creator and ruler of the entire universe, a true monotheism. And what those writers realized was that if you have just one God instead of the usual squabbling pantheon, you can't play gods off against each other and your one God had better be worth worshiping in all ways.

     

    The eventual monotheism required God to be entirely good. The Deuteronomists hadn't gotten there yet; they were more like the 19th-century American "manifest destiny" writers. (Christianity has backslid on occasion.)

     

    Many of the contradictions in the Bible arise because later writers found earlier works unsatisfactory, and they were "inspired by God" (as we say), meaning inspired by a different understanding of God, to challenge those earlier views. Christians really ought to be more conscious of this; the famous passage in the Sermon on the Mount, where Jesus says he's come to "fulfill the Law and the Prophets" (two major components of Hebrew scripture), is followed by examples in which he quotes some statement in those sources AND declares a different point of view.

     

    We need to read the Bible (or any other useful writings) for understanding in context. Bible-worship is a form of idolatry, and like any other form of idolatry, it eventually comes around to self-worship, in this case by worshiping our own interpretations.

     

    The rejection of those violent passages, by the way, is not some new idea. If you read the short book (about 3 pages) of Jonah, and don't get bogged down in the business of the big fish--a mere narrative convenience to move the story along--you'll find that the author was actually making the same point.

     

     

    Then the LORD said: “You cared about the plant, which you did not work for and which you did not grow, which appeared overnight and perished overnight. And should not I care about Nineveh, that great city, in which there are more than a hundred and twenty thousand persons who do not yet know their right hand from their left, and many beasts as well?”

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  • Hogie
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Interesting how people like you will bring up these accusations, but never cite chapter and verse to back up your claims. 

    What is true from this list is the command to carry out genocide against the inhabitants of the land God was giving to the children of Israel. What might interest you is the "why" behind that command, which they did not carry out, by the way. 

    People like you however are too lazy to dig into the Bible and see what it really says, and why it says certain things. 

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  • 2 months ago

    No, but He didn't do that. So your argument is basically just wishful thinking.

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