Can you reapply a postage stamp to a new envelope?

I put the stamps on the wrong pre-labeled envelope, could I just cut them out with scissors and use a glue stick to apply them to the correct envelope?

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  • Joe
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Of course you can and you should.  Why be wasteful ??  I do it whenever I can.

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  • In
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    No you cheap bastard, just put a new stamp on it.

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  • 2 months ago

    A glue stick won't hold it through the postal system at all. You have to use Elmer's glue.

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  • 2 months ago

    As Curtisports2 said, the USPS will reject any stamp that appears to have been previously used. In your case, it was a genuine error. The correct method is to go to the post office with the stamp still affixed to the unmailed envelope.  They can make an exchange.  That involves filling out a long form and is a pain for both you and the clerk.

    When I was a postal clerk, I helped many folks peel of postage they had mistakenly applied (usually in front of me). Self-adhesive stamps are easiest to peel off if you do it immediately. Once the stamp has been on for awhile, you have to go slowly, and possibly use a hair dryer to warm the glue up.  If you can get the stamp off intact, glue (not tape) it on to the new envelope.

    Cutting a stamp off an envelope is a dead giveaway that the stamp is being re-used. You can't ride along with the envelope all the way to explain the situation to every postal employee, so just avoid doing it. Either bring the envelope for a refund, or peel the stamp off and glue it.

    Source(s): I was a postal clerk for 29 years.
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  • 2 months ago

    No. USPS rejects stamps that appear to be reused, even if they were not canceled. Any evidence of other paper (from being stuck to something else) or glue or tape residue will be cause for rejection and return to sender.

    There is no way to know (other than you) if the piece of mail was sent by a postage cheat or someone that made an honest mistake.

    Source(s): I rejected dozens myself in my 38+ years as a carrier and I delivered hundreds more back to people who sent them out.
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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yes, I've done that.

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  • 2 months ago

    Of course..........

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