Is a rotating black hole a donut and can we travel through the donut hole safely ?

Assuming that the black hole doesn’t have an accretion disk

6 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    No! You get killed by immense gravity.

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  • John
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    I've never had faith in the Singularity and prefer to think about a Gravatar. A Gravatar can form a torus if it spins fast enough due to centrifugal force. I would stay light years away from a Black Hole or Gravatar. If frame dragging didn't kill me, something else would.

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  • 2 months ago

    No and seems they are all spinning, most anyway.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Feel free to give it a shot, what could go wrong?

    • John
      Lv 5
      2 months agoReport

      Nothing can go wrong in a thought experiment.

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  • neb
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Well, it’s not really a torus. The singularity though is not a point but a ring (1-d circle). A recent simulation showed that you could pass through the ring singularity of an idealized rotating (Kerr) black hole without being fried or pulled apart by extreme tidal forces. 

    Haven’t read the paper though, and a more realistic simulation may invalidate the previous simulation. Black hole solutions are sensitive to ‘idealizations’ which may result in white holes, wormholes, and other bizarre spacetime regions that simply may not occur in ‘real’ black holes.

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  • 2 months ago

    No. You are mistaking the event horizon of a black hole as being the black hole, the singularity that is the black hole. Eve t horizons and not torus or donut shaped. Singularities, black holes, are points that have zero. volume and zero surface area. The event horizon at the Schwarzchild radius of a black hole are spherical. Singularities have mass, but they have zero volume, radii and surface area. The laws of physics as we currently understand them break down at the event horizon.

    A wormhole requires 2 black holes.

    Event horizons are spherical, not donut shaped.

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