I’m currently writing a synopsis for a reimagining of a movie franchise. Whose permission do I need for me to go ahead with writing the book?

Update:

Who would be the right people to go to for authorisation?

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  • 1 month ago

    good luck with that. If the studio wants a reimagining of their franchise, they'll hire a writer with credentials and credits to his/her name - Oscars, awards, etc...

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  • 1 month ago

    You can write whatever you want (unless you live in a dictatorship). The problems come when you try to publish.

    If the movies are original (in the sense of not being adapted from another medium) you would probably need the permission of the studio that released the movies. If the movies are adapted from something else, you probably need the permission of whoever owns the copyright in that something else.

    Bear in mind that getting permission is extremely unlikely (as in, "winning the lottery" unlikely) unless you're already a famous author or you offer the copyright owner a very large amount of money.

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  • 1 month ago

    You should contact whoever owns the rights to the franchise.

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  • 1 month ago

    Just go ahead and write it. Nobody can stop you writing whatever you like. But you're imagining that someone else is going to be interested in reading anything you write. That's probably a big stretch. 

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  • Speed
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Whatever studio owns the rights to the franchise is the one that can allow you to reimagine its movies' world and write a fresh take.

    Fair warning, though, is that the likelihood of permission approaches zero unless you're an author with a substantial following in the genre of the movies and a string of best-selling titles. Regular writers like you and me? No chance at all.

    If you were to proceed without permission and attempt to sell the result, expect a lawsuit you cannot win.

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    • Something Blue
      Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      @Shadow, I'd also like to add that if, by some miracle, you get the permission, buying the rights to a movie franchise costs A LOT of money, in addition to hiring and paying a lawyer. This takes more than just getting permission. You're better off writing original material, man. Or a fanfic at most.

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