Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsChemistry · 1 month ago

If you have a breaker of boiling water at 100C heated by a bunsen burner, what will allow you to get the water hotter than 100C?

-Remove some of the water

-Add more water

-Heat the water more strongly

-Use a different heat source, such as a heating mantle

-Increase the atmospheric measure

-decrease the atmoshperic pressure

-add salt to water

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  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    Water boils at 100C is basic knowledge, but it's wrong.

    Puter water, with nucleating points, boils at close to 100C at Standard Pressure.

    If you increase pressure, the boiling point goes up. There are actually 3 types of boiling so be careful there too... look up nucleate, critical, transition.

    the boiling point can be calculated by using the Clausius–Clapeyron equation.

    You said "water" so I did not include the salt answer, because then it's not water but saltwater, but yes, adding salt changes the boiling point some.

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  • 1 month ago

    You can add salt. 

    Increase the pressure. That’s why it takes longer for someone to boil water in Denver than in New York. Denver is about 1 mile above sea level. 

    • hcbiochem
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Water will boil faster in Denver because the boiling point of water at that elevation is lower than the boiling point at sea level. 

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  • y
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Pressure will effect boiling points and the amount of heat the water can hold.

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  • 1 month ago

    -Increase the atmospheric PRESSURE

    adding salt will also do this, but to a small degree, about 0.5ºC addition.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Woman will be second on Ariz.'s death row

    December 23, 2004

    Wendi Andriano, sentenced yesterday, poisoned and stabbed terminally ill husband.

    The Associated Press

    MESA - A woman convicted of poisoning and stabbing her terminally ill husband was sentenced to death yesterday, becoming the second woman on Arizona's death row.

    The jury, which had deliberated the sentence since Dec. 1, struggled to decide whether to seek the execution of Wendi Andriano. Jurors reported to Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Brian Ishikawa this week that they were unable to decide. He sent them back for more deliberations.

    Andriano, who was convicted of first-degree murder Nov. 18, cried as the sentence was read.

    The sentence didn't provide closure, said the family of her husband, Joe Andriano.

    "I don't think I'll ever get over this," said his mother, Jeanette Andriano. "We're going to go on with our lives. ... We have faith in God. We have friends and family who have really supported us."

    The family will take care of the Andriano's two young children.

    "I miss my brother. ... It's going to be hard to tell them everything that's happened," said Jeanea Lambeth, Joe Andriano's sister, who will raise Wendi Andriano's 6-year-old daughter and 7-year-old son.

    During the trial, prosecutor Juan Martinez characterized Andriano as a greedy, cheating wife who poisoned her husband with pesticide, slashed his neck and bashed his head as she hastened his death in a "shockingly evil" way.

    Martinez said Andriano tried to pass off her 33-year-old husband's Oct. 8, 2000, death as a heart attack to get money from a malpractice lawsuit.

    Andriano, who testified for nine days in her defense, claimed she was battered by her husband.

    She said he flew into a rage when she told him she'd had an affair and the two got into a struggle with a knife.

    Andriano was fighting a rare form of cancer.

    Joe Andriano was struck in the head at least 23 times and stabbed in the neck, said investigators, who added that pesticide was found in the victim's stomach.

    The other woman on death row in Arizona is Debra Milke, who plotted the murder of her 4-year-old son in 1989.

    Ten women have been executed nationwide since 1976, when the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty, the Death Penalty Information Center said.

    One woman has been put to death in Arizona.

    In 1930, 52-year-old Eva Dugan was hanged for killing a Tucson rancher.

    Her head came off in the process.

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