Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 2 months ago

A hundred trillion years from now, star formation will end. Why does it end, why can't new stars form forever?

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  • 2 months ago
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    Slowly, the hydrogen available to make new stars is being used up.  It's also disbursing, getting more and more rarefied - so, new star formation will dwindle, then finally end. 

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  • 2 months ago

    They run out of fuel; hydrogen.

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  • 2 months ago

    When all the hydrogen in the universe has been fused into heavier elements, there will be nothing to make new stars out of.

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  • 2 months ago

    I can answer this a bit better than the idiots that have answered. 

    Yes, while thermodynamics do play a part, that's not the true reason.

    The real reason is that the fuel that makes stars, hydrogen, will run out and will not form any new stars. 

    Stars make their light by a process called nuclear fusion, which takes immense heat and energy to perform. When that happens, 2 hydrogen atoms collide to form helium, a byproduct of the reaction. This reaction releases a lot of heat and a lot of light, which we observe by seeing the sun. 

    There will come a point where all the hydrogen in the universe has been turned into stars, which then turn it into helium, which isn't a fuel source for stars. Stars don't burn helium to make light. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Because of the second law of thermodynamics.  Eventually, entropy will increase to the point where energy is nearly uniformly distributed throughout the universe.

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  • ANDY
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    A hundred trillion years? Where did you get this information. Red dwarfs will be shining for trillions of years to come. Matter is said to remain unchanged for a continuous creation of matter is always on the go─at least in the steady state model, the static universe that is. However, scientists also believe that with the big bang theory, matter (protons) are created in a very slow rate: that of one particle every year inside a volume of a skyscraper. But this amounts to a lot of it in an immense universe.

    So I'd say that talking about the "next" trillions of years, there will be no decrease in the amount of matter in the universe. If we want to speculate an answer, we can mention that it would take 10 elevated to one hundred or even one thousand years for the universe to start losing the energy it possesses. And if you are a good calculator, you'll know this is a bigger number than a hundred trillion.

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  • 2 months ago

    Because the material from which stars can form will be used up.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Not enough free hydrogen.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Because the hydrogen nebulas will all be used up. You need a huge cloud of hydrogen that gravity causes to collapse in on itself in order for a star to form. Stars convert that hydrogen to helium as they burn. Once they don’t have enough hydrogen anymore, they’re dead. When they die, they don’t release enough hydrogen to form new stars. 

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  • 2 months ago

    One cosmological theory is that our universe will continue to expand forever. Eventually, everything will be so far apart that no particle will ever encounter another with which to interact. Gravity will not be able to draw particles to each other. The cosmos will be a thin soup of particles doing nothing.

    There are other theories.

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