Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 2 months ago

Fill in the blanks with the appropriate and the correct preposition (à, en, au, aux, de, du, d', des) to correspond to the location given. ?

Pierre is talking about his classmates and where they live.

Sa sœur Mylène est née (1)_________Paris. Elle est (2)_________, mais maintenant elle habite (3)_________ Maroc avec son mari, Mohamed. Lui, il vient (4)_________ Maroc ; alors il est (5)_________.Mon colocataire Yao vient (6)_________ Chine et il est (7)_________. Il va accompagner Josh (8)_________États-Unis pour rencontrer leur amie Trish, qui habite (9)_________ Chicago. Elle est (10)_________, mais elle va passer un semestre (11)_________Europe.

3 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    We'll be glad to offer comments and suggestions AFTER you've actually done the work.

    If this is really too hard for you, tell your teacher and ask to move down one class. You have GOT to learn all this basic stuff, otherwise there's no point in going any further: you'll drown very fast.

    • Chi girl
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Good advice.

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  • Pontus
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Another fairly simple task.  The rules are easy, just different from English.

    a.. to express to/at/in, with a city, you use:  à

    b. to/at/in, with a feminine singular country, use: en

    c. to/at/in, with a masculine singular country, use: au

    d. to/at/in, with a plural country, regardless of gender, use: aux

    e. from, with a city OR a feminine singular country, use: de, or d'  (if the next letter is a vowel or an "h muet".  Use de if the next letter is an "aspirated h".  You simply have to memorize which words have aspirated h's. 

    f. from, with a masculine singular country, use:  du

    g. from, with a plural country, regardless of gender, use: des. 

    NOTE also:  You must have left out something for the #2 in the passage.  It doesn't make sense as is (none of those prepositions can end a French clause, which is what it appears to be doing -- something is wrong). 

    Source(s): taught French
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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Sorry.

    I can’t help you. I don’t speak Ancient Greek.

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