Evelyn asked in SportsHorse Racing · 2 months ago

How do I become a jockey?

I'm 17 though I'll be 18 here soon in December. I love horses and I have some experience with them. I am a bit weight heavy (173-175 pounds) and I know you have to be less than that. I'm 5' 4", but I don't know if I have to be shorter... I am currently unemployed, in high school, and plan on moving out of my mom's after my birthday and live with my boyfriend. I always dreamed about being a jockey when I was a little kid and I still do.

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  • 1 week ago

    You can be an exercise rider or a harness driver, not a jockey at 175.

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  • 1 month ago

    You're not going to be a jockey.  Get used to it.

    You have "some experience" with horses. At almost 18 a jockey will have been riding for years and have been working in stables since before they left school.  You're 175 lbs at 5'4. You need to lose 50 lbs before even thinking about being a jockey.  5'4 isn't a problem. The weight is.

    Google "Lester Piggott". He was a great English jockey. He was 5'8 tall (called "the long fellow") and weighed 112lbs. He was riding professionally at 12.

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  • 1 month ago

    Hdhshsgsgsgsgsggsgege

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  • 2 months ago

    Become a Horse Racing Jockey

    Horses are beautiful animals. They are used for all sorts of things, but one of the most glamorous things a horse can do is race. Every year there are 1000s of races around the world and on the back of every horse is a jockey. A jockey’s job is to race a horse from the starting gate to the finish line as fast as possible. If you don’t know much about jockeys watch Jockeys on Animal Planet. It’s a good opportunity to see if this could be the career for you.

    Jockeys need to be knowledgeable about breeding, training, performance, and what conditions are ideal for each horse.

    A good grasp of horse anatomy, breathing, grooming, shoeing, and maintaining equipment is essential too. Often jockeys get their start working at barns, stables, and racetracks as hot walkers or groomers. Many jockeys attend jockey school, but the best way to learn is by apprenticing with a respected, professional jockey. A proper apprenticeship will teach you the ropes and prepare you for schooling races that will help you learn the rules of racing, safety, and how the race world works. Schooling races are formal training sponsored by racetracks and are required for jockeys to earn a competitive racing license. After you earn a racing license, you can begin to enter races professionally and wear the brightly colored outfits of the racehorse owner.

    Jockeys need to watch races and horses constantly to learn skills that will benefit them on the racetrack. Before each race you enter, you plan a strategy to win based on the course, the conditions, and the competition. This is usually done in collaboration with racehorse owners and trainers. Jockeys have to meet weight requirements. To be a jockey you have to be small. Jockeys typically measure in around five feet and weigh about 100 pounds. You also need to be athletic and able to ride a horse well. In order to meet weight requirements, many jockeys suffer from eating disorders and starvation diets. If you make weight, you are eligible to race.

    During the race, imagine sitting on top of a 1000-pound horse racing at speeds of 30-plus miles per hour surrounded by other giant horses and jockeys willing to do whatever it takes to win. If you fall, you could be trampled, crushed, or killed. On average, two jockeys die every year. If you are prepared to take the risks, plan on paying high insurance rates. Once a jockey is in the pro horseracing world, there are lots of races and lots of money. Big name jockeys will race nearly 1000 races each year. The more races you race, the more likely you are to make money. Unfortunately, you will only make money if you win.

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    • Blue Jay
      Lv 6
      3 weeks agoReport

      I answered the question in away where it would benefit anyone who may do a general search and see that question, who may want a good general fact based answer without getting to deeply involved. Furthermore regarding the drug situation, that is not always the case either.

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  • 2 months ago

    First, prove your dedication to this career path, to yourself and to your future employers.

    Lose the weight.

    If you do not have the body type and metabolism that can keep your weight at around 100 pounds, then you cannot succeed as a jockey.

    If you're not dedicated enough to do that, you won't make it as a jockey.

    Next...  how well can you ride?   You're going to be asked to ride and control and win with flighty 2-year olds who have never been at the track before.  You're going to be expected to control stallions without blinking or failing.  You have to be very experienced and fearless.

    If you've passed both these tests, go to a track and look for someone to hire you as an exercise rider and go from there.

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  • 2 months ago

    Youre too heavy to be a jockey, do something else.

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  • 2 months ago

    You’re way too tall to be a jockey. You have to be under 5 et tall and weigh less than 100 lbs. The less you weigh the better because any extra pounds will show the horse. 

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  • 2 months ago

    Get up early, go to the track and talk to the trainers.  They'll tell you what's required.

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