Can my partner claim me on his taxes?

Update:

I am on SSDI and LTD a little over 24,000 per year.  We both are males.

11 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    Think i am stupid i am asking for the 64 billion back on the stockexchange poultry lost 325,800 in australia

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  • 2 months ago

    Wow, lots of bad & misinformed answers so far.

    If you are not married and not related, then he could possibly claim you as a dependent under the "qualifying relative" rules, which would get him a $500 tax credit.

    Don't let the name of the rule fool you - you do not actually have to be related to one another to be his "qualifying relative" - this provision is for relatives OR people who live with you (if you live together you do not have to be related to qualify).

    The complete rules for a qualifying relative can be found in publication 501 or the 1040 instructions. In summary:

    1. You cannot be a "qualifying child" of any other taxpayer

    2. You must live together the ENTIRE calendar year

    3. Your gross taxable income must be below the limit. That limit was $4150 in 2018 and I'm not sure if its being adjusted slightly for 2019 - you can look this up when the IRS releases the 2019 version of forms & publications. Although you mention that you have $24k income, SSDI is tax exempt and LTD may or may not be tax exempt depending how your policy was written and paid for.

    4. He (your partner/the person wanting to claim you) must pay more than half of your support for the year. Your SSDI and LTD income do count toward support that you provided for yourself - assuming you spent the money on support for yourself. The IRS has a worksheet for calculating support in publication 501 (page 15) as well as detailed explanation of how to handle things like the value of housing or utilities that he pays for.

    If you meet ALL of these requirements, then he can claim you as a dependent. There is no longer an exemption for dependents, but there is a $500 tax credit.

    Note that if you get married at any point, you would be able to file a joint return. This would double his standard deduction (from $12,000 to $24,000) and give him more favorable tax brackets by effectively doubling the amount of money he can earn in each tax bracket before moving to the next higher marginal tax rate.

    But keep in mind that a spouse is never a dependent - something many of the other answers don't seem to understand. Also the answer about him claiming head of household is laughable - that requires a related dependent which you are not, so don't even think about it. The person who brought that up obviously has no knowledge of US tax code.

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  • 2 months ago

    No................................... unless you are married.

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  • 2 months ago

    If you lived with them the entire year, made little to no income, etc, possibly.

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  • 2 months ago

    go to irs.gov ...

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    To claim a non-relative as a dependent:

    Test 1.  Live together all year.

      Did you?

    Test 2.  If you spent all of your SSDI/LTD, he has to have spent $24,001 on you.  Did he?

    Test 3.  Was your taxable income less than $4200?  SSDI isn't counted for this purpose because none of yours is taxable.  (One of the other posters missed this nuance.)

    Test 4.  Are you a US citizen or resident?

    Test 5. Can no one else claim you?

    .

    See IRS publication 501.  For all of this he would *still* file as single and get a $500 credit.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Basic rules to claim someone who would not usually qualify to be claimed.

    1.  They must live with you ALL YEAR.  Did you live with your partner ALL YEAR.  If so, you reached step one.

    2.  Your income MUST be below $4,200 per year.  You updated that your income from SSDI and LTD is MORE than that amount.  Your partner CAN NOT claim you as a dependent.

    • NA
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      We don't know if the LTD is more than $4200.  The SSDI doesn't count because it won't be taxable.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Are you married or just domestic partners?  If you are married, yes.  Domestic partners, no.

    Q1. Can registered domestic partners file federal tax returns using a married filing jointly or married filing separately status?

    A1. No. Registered domestic partners may not file a federal return using a married filing separately or jointly filing status. Registered domestic partners are not married under state law. Therefore, these taxpayers are not married for federal tax purposes.

    https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/answers-to-frequently...

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    • Coffee Drinker
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      A Spouse is never a dependent. If they were married they could be co-taxpayers on a joint return, but one spouse is never a dependent under the other. Safe to assume if they were married he would refer to the other person as "my spouse" or "my husband" not "my partner"

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  • 2 months ago

    If you live together, one of you can be 'head of household' and can deduct the other.  Usually it's the one who makes the most money, because then the deduction is bigger.

  • .
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Yes, if you are a legally married couple.

    • Coffee Drinker
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Actually, married couples are specifically prohibited from claiming a spouse as a dependent. The spouse is a joint taxpayer If the couple chooses to file a joint return, but they are not a dependent.

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