tae asked in TravelAsia PacificKorea · 2 months ago

What are some jobs I can take in Korea as an American citizen besides being an English Teacher?

Update:

private sectors and/or federal jobs...

2 Answers

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    That would depend on your visa type and who might be willing to hire you. Foreign workers in South Korea need to have a valid employment visa registered with the Korean government to be able to work in the country legally. All employment visas are issued by Korean Immigration, so there's no way that a foreigner could obtain legal employment without government approval. Foreigners whose visa is dependent on employment, such as foreigners from the Golden Seven English speaking countries that are legally permitted to teach English in South Korea (Americans, Australians, Britons, Canadians, Irish, New Zealanders and South Africans), must have a visa sponsor. If you do not possess a residency visa then you will need a visa sponsor as well, no matter what job you'd like to do. Generally, Koreans don't hire foreigners to do jobs that Korean nationals can do, for obvious reasons - firstly, because foreigners require expensive visas to be able to work, and secondly, because foreigners normally don't have the Korean proficiency to perform most jobs in the first place.

    That's why most foreigners working in South Korea are doing jobs that A) Koreans are not qualified to do, such as teach foreign languages; or B) Koreans don't want to do, such as working in a factory or on a farm. 

    If you have an impressive level of education and extensive experience in a desired field, then you might be able to work for a Korean company in the corporate sector. There are plenty of engineers - automotive, chemical, electrical, mechanical, etc., working for Korean firms, but again, you'd have to be something special because there are plenty of engineers here already, many of them bilingual. 

    If you don't want to TEACH English, you might be able to find a job doing something that's RELATED TO English, such as working as a headhunter or recruiter for companies that hire teachers, or you might be able to find work developing material for textbooks, but unless you have experience doing that in your home country, it's unlikely that you'd be considered much of an asset, not to mention that Korean companies can outsource recruiting jobs to people who are not in the country, so being here isn't really a bonus for that. 

    Your last option would be to open a business here or to work for a foreigner who already has one, but that would require a major investment. To legally open a business here you'd have to procure a business visa and they are very expensive - around $100,000, and of course you'd have to be able to do all of the things associated with running a business - rent a space, hire people, procure supplies, etc., and without a Korean partner, that wouldn't be easy. And foreigners that already have a business here would prefer to hire Korean nationals because it's cheaper, but if you could find one willing to hire you, the pay would likely be dismal and you'd be doing unskilled labour like bartending or serving, cooking or cleaning, etc., so it wouldn't be much of a living. 

    Teaching is the easiest thing to do if you're from a Golden Seven country because all you need is a BA or BS, or an MA or MS... a clean criminal background check... and to be in good health... and of course you will need to provide proof of all of those things and have your documents approved, but other than that, it's the easiest form of work for Westerners who are native speakers of English. 

    South Korean nationals would have limited options in the USA, and practically none if they couldn't speak passable English, so it shouldn't come as a surprise to you that your options are also basically zero other than teaching English for $500 a week before taxes. 

          

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  • martin
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    South Korea is a close ally of America, including business connections between the 2 countries. You could work for a company that imports or exports from or to America.

    • Andrew
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      The fact that two countries happen to be allies does not mean that citizens of one nation can simply go and work in the other without a problem. Americans cannot simply fly to Germany and get hired by a German firm and work there indefinitely. Your information is completely inaccurate.  

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