Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Home & GardenMaintenance & Repairs · 2 months ago

Load Bearing Wall Question?

I plan on removing a beam separating the dining and kitchen. It use to be a doorway wall to the garage. The 2x6s going across the ceiling have a board nailed on to them. The board is resting at the end of the house and the other end in the middle of the house. The roof is not resting on it, only holds the drywall. Will the board support the ceiling if I remove the beam? Where the arrows are pointing is the beam I want to remove.

Update:

At one end there's the jack,King stud for the old door way but it's only 12" from the ceiling like the beam... The beam just hangs with no support 4" before it reach the jack and king stud. Pretty much only a 2x4 that goes from end to end is holding the ceiling up.

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Can't understand your question. But you do not want your wall to just end without support. A free end is not stable, and you should not rely upon what is left to provide stability. The second thing is that the remaining lumber be positioned correctly to hold the load. A 2x6 is strong when loaded across the 6" depth, a lot less strong when loaded across the 2" depth. So there is a orientation problem.

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  • 2 months ago

    As you clearly don't know that, you MUST have someone that knows what to look for actually inspect the project ON SITE. This isn't something that can be done properly from

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  • 2 months ago

    If it is actually a load bearing wall, it IS supporting the structure of the building and CAN'T be removed without providing alternate support. That is LITERALLY the DEFINITION of load bearing.

    As you clearly don't know that, you MUST have someone that knows what to look for actually inspect the project ON SITE. This isn't something that can be done properly from a photo.

    • Manny2 months agoReport

      True...

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  • 2 months ago

    That "beam" is what is holding the ceiling joists up. The board that is on top of the ceiling joists that I see in the picture is called a strong back. The purpose of the strong back is to keep the ceiling joists in the upright position by keeping them all aligned. It is not for vertical structural support. What I also see in the picture is the area on the right hand side of the beam. It appears that whatever that ceiling is, it also is using the beam to hold it up as well!

    The only way to remove the beam in the room is to replace it with a beam installed in the attic. It will take some engineering to do this task so you will need some professional intervention.

    • ...Show all comments
    • mermeliz
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      https://www.homedepot.com/p/Simpson-Strong-Tie-LUS-ZMAX-Galvanized-Face-Mount-Joist-Hanger-for-2x6-LUS26Z/100375105

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  • GTB
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I would not do this

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  • Droopy
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    Sure if you want your ceiling to eventually fall on you or worse someone else.  And then when you turn in the accident to your insurance they drop you when they see what you did.  Then you get sued by who ever gets hurt.  An now your broke probably have to sell the house which you make no money off of because you have to fix that nice opening you made plus pay tour legal bills.

    Yea i think its worth taking that beam out so the house looks prettier. 

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  • 2 months ago

    im a builder ..uk ..NO you cannot remove that beam without replacing it with another ..the fact you need to ask shows you should not touch it ..the joist to the left are sitting on it ..if unsure get a structural engineer 

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  • Snezzy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    That kind of modification can end in disaster, and what's more your homeowner's insurance will not cover the damage.

    Hire a structural engineer (not a beer buddy or a handyman carpenter) to look at the beam before you make any changes at all. Really. Yes, really.

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  • 2 months ago

    It may not support the roof, but it does support the ceiling.  You need a header.

    • duker918
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      He needs an engineer and a contractor.

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  • 2 months ago

    The board in the picture perpendicular to the 2x6's (?) that are the ceiling below(?) has no structural value.  If that is what you hope will hold up the ceiling it is only hope.

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