Can a landlord take pictures of our patio without our consent?

It can only be accessed through our apartment (not a common area), but we were told by other residents that they were leaning over our patio partitions to take pictures of our patio. We were given no notice and have no idea why they were doing it. We have nothing in violation, but even if we did, shouldn't they let us know they are taking pictures or if we need to change something?

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  • Sally
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    I don't know if it's legal or not, but it is definitely intrusive. I would call the landlord and (nicely) ask if something is wrong about the patio and say you would appreciate being in the loop about the property you're renting. It could be they are planning some renovations or something, so there are some innocent explanations.

    • I agree. Thanks for the advice. I've just heard from other residents about bad attitudes with management. In fact, I just found out that there is a new manager (and has been for a few months). I don't want to bring on any retaliation, but might feel things out to see if I can ask.

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  • 2 months ago

    Taking the photos from locations outside of your designated living space (even just over a fence) would be legal and probably seen as normal observation of a business property.

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  • 2 months ago

    Yes, the LL can take pictures of their property.

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  • 2 months ago

    (1)

    Landlord/Tenant law almost always varies from state to state.

    Sometimes it even varies from city to city within a state.

    (2)

    Anyway, in NY City a LL is not allowed to take a picture of your personal property without your consent.

    The LL can take pictures of his property at any time but cannot enter your rented space without your permission.

    (3)

    Now in the case of the outdoor patio, the LL could argue that he was taking a picture of the ground and that inclusion of your patio furniture in the picture was inconsequential and that it caused you no harm or loss.

    In addition, Google Earth can also see your patio furniture and so can some neighbors and therefore if somebody sees your patio furniture you don’t mind.

    A judge would likely agree.

    However a judge would likely frown upon a LL taking a picture of your bathroom through the bathroom window.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Without knowing WHERE this is impossible to answer.  I am in Pennsylvania, and I own rental property.  I AM "allowed by law" to take photos of MY property without prior notice to the tenant IF I believe there is a condition or problem which needs to be addressed.

    If they can't see the patio how do they know you "need to change something?"  The photographs make sense, particularly if the landlord is considering an eviction.

    • Texas. I completely understand that this is not my property. In fact, I have no problem with them wanting to see. I just wish they'd have told me why. They can't see inside the apartment either. No communication is odd to me. We've had no rental probs & always pay on time, usually early.

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  • Bruce
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    He can take pictures of his property. 

    He is required to give notice before entering your apartment unless it is an emergency. I do not know if it was an emergency. 

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Why don't you read your rental agreement or your lease agreement

    • I did. They can enter without consent but must leave a note to let us know they did. In this case, that did not happen. I was just curious to see if this was a standard practice.

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  • Rayal
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    With notice (in the US)  landlords can inspect the property and take any pictures they want of the property.

    • Thanks. I was just curious to see if this was a standard practice.

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  • 2 months ago

    Have you read your rental agreement?

    • I did. They can enter without consent but must leave a note to let us know they did. In this case, that did not happen. I was just curious to see if this was a standard practice.

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