Lien happens after purchasing the lot with County.?

We bought the property in June 2016. In 2014, The County has mistakenly assigned this bill {demolition bill of $12,770} to the wrong address. This issue had not been corrected until sometimes in 2017. Now they send the bill to us.

The lady at the Office of Tax Commissioner said that we are supposed to pay that bill {$12,770 by December 20th 2019}, even though that issue occurred well before we purchased that property. She suggested that we talk to our closing Attorney whom we closed the lot and the Title Insurance. So, could you give us some advice. Thank you so much 

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  • 2 weeks ago

    I did a long term radon test in my basement years ago because my area of the country has a lot of granite in the ground, which can be a carrier of radon. I picked up my instruments from work but you can purchase a test kit at Lowe's if your not in the  field. My instruments were just more sensitive. They picked up about 3 mrem for a complete year which is about the same as sunbathing once or twice a summer for an hour. I chalk it up to my annual background radiation dose. I would call this a beneficial dose and healthy to the body.

  • 2 weeks ago

    Contact your title insurance company and let them handle it.  If the lien was there when you closed either the title insurance company missed it or it's the wrong address.  I suspect there was a building on the lot that the county condemned and demolished prior to your buying the property.

  • 2 weeks ago

    You own the property - it's YOUR bill to pay.  If you had a real estate lawyer handle the transaction, he should have caught the lien when doing due diligence on the property.  If he had paid it then, you might be entitled to a refund now.  However, when you buy a property, any and all outstanding liens are now yours.  If you did not have a lawyer handle the transaction, then it was your responsibility to do your own due diligence.  Since you didn't, the bill is yours to pay.  I don't see how you can get around it.  You can argue it but be prepared to pay it by the due date, in case they refuse to give you a break.  Counties generally do not give people breaks.

    Source(s): Certified Paralegal, with 25+ years' experience.
  • 2 weeks ago

    You talk to the title insurance people.

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  • Anonymous
    2 weeks ago

    So the Tax Commissioner lady suggests you talk to the closing attorney, but you decide you'll get better answers from YA?!  

    What the tax lady probably didn't explain is that it's very possible that attorney messed up big.  Part of what you paid them for is checking for liens and other issues.   I suggest you call them, but make it clear they have some explaining to do.  Even if they somehow did nothing wrong, they can send one certified letter to put an end to this.  

    • SimplytheFACTS
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      sounds like the lien was NOT on this property. ity was wrongly placed on another.

  • 2 weeks ago

    Can't really say if you owe this bill or not from what you've written but if the charge preceded you purchasing the house and its a lien on the house then this should be covered by your title insurance assuming you purchased that when you bought the place.  

    So, go pull out your closing statement from when you bought the place and make sure you did get title insurance and if you did then get with your closing attorney (who will then get with the title insurer) and they should handle this charge.  

    Even if the charge is completely wrong I'd just let them handle it as they're paying it or not so they'll take care of it one way or the other.

    If you didn't get title insurance when you bought the house (this is rare and if you got a loan you would've been required to get it by the bank) then you better proceed fighting it yourself.

  • Eva
    Lv 7
    2 weeks ago

    She gave you the correct information. This is an issue for the attorney and the title company.

  • P
    Lv 7
    2 weeks ago

    This is a very urgent matter.  You could actually lose the property if you continue to wait it out.  The advise is correct.  You need to contact an attorney and the title insurance company.  Unfortunately since there was no way for the title insurance company to know about it they probably will try to get out of paying it.  My guess is that you will have to hire an attorney to go to court to force the county to release the lien given their mistake.  The county probably needs to go after the previous owner, but they won't do that unless you get a judge to force them to.   If the judge denies it, then you will have to pay it and sue the previous owner yourself. 

  • Anonymous
    2 weeks ago

    Talking to the lawyer is the right thing to do.  If the lien was on the property at closing, it should have been addressed long ago. 

  • Anonymous
    2 weeks ago

    Talk to your attorney.  The local government may well come after you for the money (they don't really care who pays) and you might have to go after the previous owner.

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