Which type of bond is characterized by a lattice surrounded by a sea of mobile electrons?

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  • 2 weeks ago

    The notion that metals are made up of "a lattice of cations surrounded by a sea of mobile electrons" is full of holes.  It's a view of metallic bonding that needs to be retired. Mainly, because it's wrong.

    Metal atoms are held together by a type of covalent bonding where the outermost orbitals overlap.  The orbital of one atom doesn't just overlap the orbital of an adjacent atom, the outermost orbital of one atom overlaps the orbitals of every neighboring atom.  The orbitals of those atoms overlap all of their neighbors orbitals, so that the every outermost orbital overlaps all of the orbitals in the entire sample.  This produces delocalized electrons which can easily move from atom to atom.

    But notice that we keep saying "atom" rather than "ion".  The metal atoms don't lose their valence electrons. All the metal atoms are neutral.  The thing that makes it a metal -- and have metallic bonding -- is the ease with which electrons move from atom to atom through all the overlapping orbitals (delocalized electrons).  This is what gives metals their good electrical conductivity.

  • Anonymous
    2 weeks ago

    An alligator bond is the type of the bond

  • Anonymous
    2 weeks ago

    Metallic Bonds

    If it helps you remember, think of melted metal.. it's like a sea of electrons lol

    That's why you can bend foil so easily without it breaking like wood or something. The electrons are mobile. It's also why metals conduct electricity.

  • 2 weeks ago

    A chemical bond

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