Was the English language from Henry the Fifth time pretty different from today's English?

If so, no one would be able to understand it much without first studying it?

Update:

If you travel back in time to that era, how well would you be able to communicate with the English people in case you don't previously study it?

7 Answers

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  • 3 weeks ago

    The English language has evolved into a universal world wide language that is dynamic and constantly changing with new words and definitions of existing words. Old English would use a very much reduced vocabulary than modern English which means that it would sound very different

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    If you can understand the Canterbury Tales as Chaucer wrote it, you would be good to go.  Of tribulacion in mariage, of which I am expert in al myn age this is to seyn, myself have been the whippe, as the Wife of Bath might say. Language was very much spoken, not written (excepty by a few) - so hardlie anywun wood ken thou were spylling all thy wordes wrong.

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    If you can listen to someone reading (rather than being flummoxed by reading) you can glean the meaning. If you wanted to find the way to the local church or buy a loaf of bread you would have little trouble. If you wanted to seduce the local maidens or trade fabrics you might struggle.

    However in England at the time (and until relatively recently) there were also dialects spoken.

  • 3 weeks ago

    I was studying old English at university. they gave us one paragraph to translate at exam and everyone failed because it required much more time they gave us because we had to look every word in special old English dictionary. letters were different, words were different and no, u would not understand what they were saying. also if u want more modern English language try reading Chaucer. I tried - not a word. even thou by that time at least letters were similar to modern ones

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  • larry1
    Lv 6
    3 weeks ago

    Yes, different but with some difficulty we could understand nearly all of it. Henry V was when Chaucer wrote (the great Medieval English writer who wrote Canterbury Tales 1390-1400). It's called late 'Middle English'. 

    Example.....Chaucer writes.....

    'Wepyng and waylyng care and oother sorrow....I knowe yongh, on even amorwe...'

    We write.....Weeping and wailing care and other sorrow...I know enough in the evening and morning.

    Also they pronounced some vowels different and said silent letters such as for 'I care' they would say 'I car e'.

    Google Canterbury Tales the Wikipedia article has examples under 'text', plus other sites.

     

  • 3 weeks ago

    Here's a fun tid bit. The English language during the 1600-1700s sounded very much like the American language today. In other words, what we hear of the English language today is a recent accent that evolved in the last two to three hundred years.

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    That depends on how stupid one is. People who studied linguistics in school would be able to understand it just fine. People who studied crap bullsh(t nonsense subjects like "corporate finance" would be burnt at the stake back then.

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