Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 2 months ago

Should I work at a dog kennel if I have an 8 week old puppy?

I am getting an 8 week old puppy in December and it will have it’s first round of shots by then. I have a family friend asking if I can pick up shifts at a dog kennel (it usually houses over 100 healthy pets at a time) during the last two weeks of December and early January. It would only be 3 or 4 half days a week and I have family to watch the puppy while I am gone. I would be able to shower and throw my clothes in the laundry before I see the puppy after work, but my car would be around my clothing when I drive home from work.

I am mostly worried about possible disease exposure to my new dog before it has completed its shot series. Any veterinarians out there or veterinary assistants, is this wise? Or would the extra money be not worth the risk of exposure?

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  • 2 months ago

    You can absolutely work at the kennel and have a puppy at home.  You will have to be vigilant about changing your clothes, washing your hands and hair and disinfecting your shoes.  Any reputable kennel will have a product called F10 (or Trigene) as a foot bath and as a spray and kennel disinfectant to stop the spread of parvovirus and coronavirus.

    While kennel cough and distemper  is a concern, YOU can not contract and therefore transmit it to your puppy.  They are airborne viruses which is why you must change your clothes (be sure to wash them in HOT water) and wash your hands and hair, but you can not contract it and then bring it home to puppy.

    Ensure your puppy is getting ALL of his/her puppy vaccinations to be able to fight off any infections that come his way.  Vaccinations are not bullet-proof though, be vigilant with hygiene.

    Just be sure to follow correct hygiene before handling your puppy.  Perhaps wear different shoes at the kennel and be sure to F10 yourself.  It works as a shoe-dip and an all-over body spray.  Edit:  Just a comment because I think people misunderstand...   

     

    Vaccinations do not prevent pets from contracting viruses.  It helps them fight off infections when they're exposed to them.  Any pet, vaccinated or not, can be a carrier.  The vaccination is to protect THAT dog, not every other one around it.   

     

    Vaccines stimulate the immune system of that particular dog to recognize and fight off specific viruses and diseases.  It does nothing to stop another unvaccinated (or vaccinated for that matter- they're not bullet proof) pets from contracting diseases. 

     

    Also, vaccines are not magic wands that completely protect from any disease.  They're meant to stimulate the immune system to recognize and fight it off, as I said, but that's all it does.  Everyone's body is different, reacts differently to colds and flu and infections,  and so do animals.  Just because they're fully vaccinated, doesn't mean their immunity is bullet proof.I've been a vet  for 21 years, working with all manner of infectious diseases and not once have I brought any home to my pets.Vaccinations and proper hygiene matter.

    Source(s): vet 21 years
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  • Ocimom
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I would not do it.  Talk to your vet and see what he/she thinks is the wisest decision.  Pups can pick up so many things when young and are higher risk.  You puppy would not have full set of shots till older and, therefore, at risk for you being home parvo, kennel cough, etc.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yes. I did this with me basset hound puppy. 

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  • 2 months ago

    No, it is NOT wise.  Parvo & Distemper can live anywhere & everywhere in the environment.  You can bring such into your home - on your shoes from almost any outing, but you DO NOT "KNOW" - whether the kennel dogs are 100% healthy & NOTHING will completely protect them from kennel cough (since there are more versions than nasal vaccines) or the more serious canine flu (also a virus) - but not one most dogs are vaccinated to prevent.  And only some puppies get protection from Coronavirus, in the multi-vaccine shots.  You do not know WHEN the kennel last got shots & whether they are actually "protected".  You are simply making ASSUMPTIONS.  

    Your puppy should have ONLY JUST GOTTEN its first shot vaccines at 7 to 8 weeks.  It will have NO IMMUNITY for two weeks thereafter - and only "some" immunity; not anything LIKE "full" immunity.  

    (If we TITER TESTED all 100 kennel dogs, I bet some of them would be inadequately protected from either, or both Parvo or Distemper viruses.)  I had a puppy complete 3 sets of puppy shots/boosters as required by my breeder, but she INSISTED he be titer checked for immunity levels... BEFORE the 16 week rabies (and our start in an obedience class) - and he DID NOT pass muster on the titer test for DISTEMPER, despite being given all vaccines, by a vet.

    If your incompletely protected puppy is exposed to EITHER virus, but esp Parvo, there is up to an 80% chance of it DYING from it, and if it gets sick => hospitalization & fluids can run you ONE to TWO THOUSAND DOLLAR$.  Do you want to risk either scenario?

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    • BBG
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Only a dumb breeder would require that many vaccines AND titer tests BEFORE 16 weeks.   Anyone in the veterinary field could have predicted that outcome, but vets know not to argue with clients who think their crazy breeder knows more than the vet.  No harm in running the titer...

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  • 2 months ago

    No because you Can contract kennel cough in your clothes and bring it home

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  • 2 months ago

    You shouldnt even have an 8 week old puppy to begin with.....So no not at all !  :::::

    It seems you are gonna be a hungry little troll this winter eh

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Most likely it's fine.  

    It would be very unusual for you to expose your puppy to a disease such as distemper or parvo especially if you are changing your shoes/clothes and showering.

    The thing you're most likely to expose your puppy to is kennel cough.  It's airborne and therefore quite contagious.  

    I've worked in a veterinary hospital for 27 years where we have sick animals every single day and I've not once brought something home to any of my pets - even my ancient dog with two auto-immune diseases who takes an immunosuppressant chemo drug.   Before that I worked in a large urban animal shelter for six years and the worst thing that happened (including bringing home many pups/kits to foster) was a little spot of ringworm. 

    No one has more pets than veterinary hospital/shelter employees and no one is around more sick pets than veterinary hospital/shelter employees.   The sky is not falling.  

    You have a sound plan in place based on common sense that will greatly minimize potential exposure. 

    If you want to do it, I vote do it.  

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    My sister works at a kennel.  There is NO WAY to guarantee that dogs are healthy.  Like people, symptoms don't appear immediately.

    She changes her clothes AT THE KENNEL, outside the animal area, before she comes home, scrubs her arms as well as she can, keeps her "work clothes" separate from the family laundry.

    Here's a random thought.  Ask the Vet that the kennel relies on.

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  • 2 months ago

    It's fine, just bleach your shoes before you enter the home or yard. Step in bleach so that the rubber bottoms are completely surrounded.

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