Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationMaintenance & Repairs · 2 months ago

would putting "thread lock" on a screw /bolt that is not fully tightening into the threaded hole be the solution to that problem?

not sure if the threaded hole got warped? or just worn out due to over tightening the screw or bolt or what. but the bolt /screw will just keep turning and wont completely tighten . would putting "thread lock" on the screw be the solution or just create more problems (if ever need to unscrew it again to replace part)? why?

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Pull the bolt out and inspect its threads and the threads for the hole for obvious damage, trying a new bolt if you have one the same size. If the hole threads are shot then the only real options are to try to re-tap the threads or drill/ream the hole and install a heli-coil or similar product. 

    You can use a non-permenent thread lock product if there isn't any tension/expansion/pressure on the union there and hope it works. There are various locking compound capacities, just so you know. Can't assure you that will work, seen people use white Teflon tape in a pinch just to grab and hold, but anything like on an engine or piece of equipment you're better off doing a real repair and not bubble gum and baling wire. 

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  • M.
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No.

    That's NOT what thread lock is for.

    There are ways of repairing threads.

    You need to repair the problem.

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  • 2 months ago

    That is not the solution. I would create new threads with a larger tap and screw in a bolt that fits.

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    • noname2 months agoReport

       
      Depends on What its screwed to.  If one of  4 on an AC compressor, and you cant easily remove it to  chase threads, tap oversize, or  helicoil  Locktite Blue is ok. A head bolt, No.  
       
       

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  • Jason
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    That's why I keep helicoil kits in my toolbox at work. M6x1.00, M8x1.25 and M10x1.50. 

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  • Kenny
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You are looking for a thread repair kit (ie https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/NCB28654  ) but depends of the strength needed.  Best to re-tap.  Why thread lock will not work well;  their properties is an adhesives.  The red TL will not even solidify in this condition.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It will do.  The screw is still removable when you use a screwdriver.  Or jamb in a slightly larger screw.

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  • 2 months ago

    No. Thread lock is meant to keep a screw in a properly threaded hole. Not the other way around. 

    If this hole is wood, just stick a toothpick in there and then screw the screw in there. If the hole is metal, I NO KNOW, I GUESS YOU BE ****ed. 

    Source(s): nothing
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  • 2 months ago

    No, all you are doing is creating a future failure.

    Try another bolt, if that doesn't work you may need to retap the thread.

    The job has to be done right sooner or later so why not do it right first time and save yourself bother later?

    • noname2 months agoReport

      De[pends on What its screwed to.  If one of f 4 on an AC compressor, and you cant easily remove it to  chase threads, tap oversize, or  helicoil  Locktite Blue is ok. A head bolt, No.

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  • Dan
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    No, thread lock won't help at all. The best solution would be to drill and tap the thread to the next largest size or install a repair insert such as a Heli-Coil.

    • noname2 months agoReport

       
      De[pends on What its screwed to.  If one of  4 on an AC compressor, and you cant easily remove it to  chase threads, tap oversize, or  helicoil  Locktite Blue is ok. A head bolt, No.

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  • Brian
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You could try putting either a wooden toothpick or matchstick in the hole, and then screwing in the bolt.

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