Who pays the estate bills of the deceased?

So my father passed away and left me with executor dutys,  there are 4 Heirs including me. I inherited my fathers property. We are having a dispute because the Heirs insist that i pay all of the unkeep on the house including property tax and condition to maintain the property and i feel like that is the estates job seeing that the house is not in my name yet? Do I have to pay these property expenses although the property has not been transferred to me yet in indiana? Please advise and provide me with websites. Thank you

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    Any debts that existed before the death are the responsibility of the estate and must be paid out of the deceased's money.  Which means less for the other heirs.  Meanwhile, the house is still part of the estate until it is transferred to you, so the estate is still responsible for paying the bills.  Just as any investment income the estate gets is added to the estate until it is finally distributed - you can't say who else's it is until then.

    • Why are you assuming that the house forms part of the estate?  He might have been left it in trust or it might have been owned jointly with rights of survivorship. In either of those situations the house might not yet be in his name but estate would not have to pay bills.

  • 3 weeks ago

    If I was the executor of an estate from which I was the beneficiary of property and there were other heirs that were not getting the property I would have the estate hire an attorney. The potential that one or all the other heirs will attempt to sue you is substantial. Because of that you have a serious need for legal council to be sure you are doing everything exactly "by the book".

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Are you living in the house?  Are you paying the Estate fair market rents?

  • 3 weeks ago

    The estate pays. However, until everything gets sorted out, you might have to pay them. When all the legal stuff is delt with you can submit the bills and be reimbursed from the estate before it is divided between the benefactors.

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  • 3 weeks ago

    Everything depends on the way in which you inherited the house.  If you were a joint owner with your father and had rights of survival or it was in trust/entail, it would have bypassed the estate.  You would have owned it immediately whether it was put into your name or not and would have been responsible for the expenses from then on.  You can just move in.

    If the will states you get the house it forms part of the estate and you will not know whether you can actually inherit until all the estate's debts have been paid.  So in that situation the estate has to continue to fund the house until probate is settled.  Of course anyone now living in the house must pay a market rent to the estate. 

  • Eva
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    The estate pays the expenses until the house is transferred to you. You cannot unreasonably delay the transfer. The estate does not pay for upgrades to the property and you would have to reimburse the estate for any property taxes it had paid for any period after the transfer. Ex: the estate paid school taxes for the period 7/1/19 - 6/30/20. The house is transferred to you on 1/1/20. You have to reimburse the estate the taxes attributable to the period 1/1 - 6/30/20.

  • 3 weeks ago

    There should not be too many costs the estate needs to pay on this during the process. with a clear will, it should not take overly long. There should be almost nothing you need to do to maintain the property unless the process becomes lengthy.

    But you are right, any necessary costs are borne by the estate (property tax).

  • 3 weeks ago

    You became the owner upon your father's death. Everything else is process.

  • 3 weeks ago

    Until the real property is in YOUR name, the estate remains responsible for home costs such as utilities, taxes, and maintenance. They don't think it's fair, but they're wrong.

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