Which stage of cognitive development does the fear of heights set in?

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  • 3 weeks ago
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    There's some controversy about this. All we know is that when babies have a little crawling experience they avoid crawling over the experimental fake cliff.

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    https://www.pri.org/stories/2015-04-13/babies-dont...

    The visual cliff experiment by Eleanor Gibson and R.D. Walk in 1960 demonstrated the response by human and animal infants to a visual obstacle.

    “It’s a glass table, and on one side there’s a checkboard pattern surface right under the glass. The other side of the table the patterned surface is way down on the floor. so visually it looks like a big three-foot drop-off,” Adolphs says. The experiment became a shaky foundation for the myth that crawling innately teaches us to fear heights.

    The visual cliff, however, was a better test of the infant’s depth perception — and not their fear of heights. Watch closely, and you’ll notice that the babies — new crawlers — aren’t particularly scared and will crawl right onto the glass. But a baby with several weeks of crawling experience will begin to refuse to crawl over the drop-off, but will use their arms to feel their way through the obstacle. And they do so without fearful emotion.

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