Julia asked in Arts & HumanitiesPhilosophy · 4 weeks ago

What kind of philosophical issues can science not answer?

24 Answers

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  • 3 weeks ago

    .....Almost all

  • 4 weeks ago

    What is "love"?

    What meaning do I look for in life?

  • 4 weeks ago

      Science can not adequately answer all philosophical questions, or even a very large portion of them because science is a subset of philosophy and wholly dependent upon it for its existence in much the same way that science would be almost nothing as we know it without mathematics of any sort.

    • Larry K.
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      Science is certainly dependent upon math, but is definitely not a subset of philosophy. Morality and ethics are often associated with scientific discovery, but such considerations have nothing to do with pure science. You may as well attempt to associate math with philosophy.

  • 4 weeks ago

    About God. Science is dumb in that.

    • Larry K.
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      Not associating god or gods with science is not dumb; it is imperative. I won't accuse you of being "dumb" ( i.e. stupid), but you are obviously ignorant.

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  • small
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    If an issue is answered by science and proved, it would no longer remain a philosophical issue.

  • Liz
    Lv 4
    4 weeks ago

    A BOOK THAT ADDRESSES LIFE’S BIG QUESTIONS

    Science has answers to all kinds of questions. But science, enlightening though it is, has limits. Most scientists, doctors, and philosophers agree that science cannot answer ethical, moral, or religious questions.

    SCIENCE CAN give us mathematical formulas for laws governing the universe, but science cannot tell us why the universe exists or why it is governed by precise laws.

    SCIENCE CAN explain how the reproductive organs function, but it cannot define sexual morality.

    SCIENCE CAN describe the development of a human embryo, but it cannot make moral decisions on the embryo’s right to life.

    The Bible addresses these and many other important questions, thus helping us to “understand what is righteous and just and fair, the entire course of what is good.”—Proverbs 2:9.

    Source(s): jw.org
  • P
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Subjective ones                   

  • 4 weeks ago

    Human Beings and parasites share many similarities. Why is it okay to exterminate one, but not the other? In other words, justify our human existence in why we deserve life more than a parasite.

  • j153e
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Any issues which are not quantifiable in terms of atomic-scale measurement are very problematic; the less difficult of these latter include issues of psychology, sociology, and political science; the more difficult topics include the understanding of Energy (not simply measuring energies); the questions of ethics; the question of consciousness; the questions of God, Soul, Love, and Immortality.

    Related:

    "Understanding Yourself" by Mark Prophet;

    "The Slightest Philosophy" by Quee Nelson;

    "Ethics:  Discovering Right and Wrong" by Louis Pojman;

    "The Philosophers:  Their Lives and the Nature of Their Thought" by Ben-Ami Scharfstein;

    "Intellectuals" by Paul Johnson;

    "Return to the One:  Plotinus's Guide to God-Realization."

  • 4 weeks ago

    The existence of luck?

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