Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceRenting & Real Estate · 3 weeks ago

Why is my landlord refusing to replace my old carpeting?

I've been told it's not necessary to replace old carpeting unless it poses a health risk. I wouldn't say it's a health risk, but it possibly may be since it's 30 YEARS OLD. There are stains on it & anyone can clearly see it's very worn out. I have a large rug over the top of it to try to make it looker better. I just found something that says a landlord needs to replace carpeting every 8 to 10 years on California. The landlord told me if he did anything he would want to tear the carpet out & refinish the hardwood floors. This would be a big mess & cause a major disruption for my wife & myself. See below what I found about Ca. law on this.

Under California landlord-tenant guidelines, a carpet's useful life is eight to 10 years. The cost of replacing the carpet after 10 years falls to the landlord.

Update:

If we agree to having the hardwood floors refinished does he have to do this while we live here? He's acting like he really only wants to do this when we move & we aren't planning on moving anytime soon.

12 Answers

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  • 3 weeks ago

    A guideline is just a guidelines, NOT a law.  Further, carpet wears differently depending on the material, the wear and tear and the under padding.  Good under padding will give carpet a longer life.  The landlord is NOT required to replace the carpet.  You get what you rented, and he is not likely to do it while tenants are in the unit.  That sort of work is done BETWEEN tenants.  He has a right to choose to remove it and utilize the hardwood floor.  Again, that isn't likely while you live there.

    Source(s): Certified Paralegal, with 25+ years' experience & with Landlord & Tenant law experience.
  • Judy
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    YOU don't get to decide between carpet and hardwood floors.

  • 3 weeks ago

    my rug is from about 1988...its okay.

    its your job to shampoo it to reduce health risk from contamination...and if its not falling apart its not a health risk due to tripping.

    SMH, there is a difference between a GUIDELINE and a LAW...the guideline just means that the carpet has $0 value after 10 years (unless prove otherwise).

    if you want new rugs while you live there, yes the landlord can do all related maintenance at that time, what do you expect the LL to do?  tear up the rug after you move to redo the floors?

    if you want new rugs that bad and don't want to be inconvenienced, pay for it yourself with the LLs permission.

    tenants fail to realize that maintenance and updates cost money....demand things, but then complain the rent is too high...you want nicer, you need to pay more.

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    That does not mean he has to replace the carpet.  The 8 to 10 year comment refers to the lifespan in terms of what he can charge for replacement if you damage it.  If the carpet is 10 years old, it's considered past its lifetime and he would be unable to charge you for excessive 'wear and tear'.

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  • 3 weeks ago

    I don't think you would want to be living there while people are finishing flooring because of the noise and mess they make, also you would have to stay off the floors until the stain and sealant dry.  Having wood flooring would cause you to have to be more careful, if you drop something on it, it could scar the floor. Would you really want someone in your place when you're not there? I think it would be better to find somewhere else to live. There's no telling what kind of condition those wood floors are in. I would think I would rather put down laminate flooring myself than to have to go through all the stuff you will have to. HE WOULD BE RESPONSIBLE FOR BUYING IT and hopefully he would let you pick out something you like.  You probably don't know anything about putting down laminate but UTube has some videos that could help you. That way you could move your things from 1 side of the room to the other side. 

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      I once got a landlord agree to allow me to refinish the softwood floors, repaint the place, and other things and deduct the costs from my monthly rent.  Worked out great for everyone: they got renovations at cost, I got a nicer apartment for much lower rent, and had a built-in hobby.

  • 3 weeks ago

    Here is the problem. The landlord wants to stop using carpeting and go to hard flooring and doesn't want to waste the money on carpet he intends to get rid of. You will need to suffer a small inconvenience for a couple of days while the carpeting is removed and the floor is refinished. Ask if he will pay for a motel nearby for that period.

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Bob, he may be waiting until your lease expires and not renew a new lease for you.

    • Bob3 weeks agoReport

      We are on a month to month lease & he can't make us move because we are under rent control.

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    If it's not a safety issue he doesn't have to replace it. That's not a mandated law .

  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    California law does not specify when landlords must replace carpeting in rental units. It does clarify that worn or aged, but otherwise undamaged, carpet does not affect a property's habitability.

    • Maxi
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      You rent it is not your choice what flooring the landlord decides to have in their own property

  • y
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    The landlord has told you what he will do if you continue to push for a replacement. He has the right to have whatever type of flooring he wants installed. So keeping pushing and you'll get the hardwood or you can live with the stains.

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