Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthMental Health · 4 weeks ago

Can a 65-year-old woman who lives independently, has her own car, remembers where she lives, and recognizes others she knows, have dementia?

Let’s say she doesn’t require a home caretaker, and does her daily routines on her own. But at the same time, she randomly gets into arguments with her son because she’s unknowingly forgetting things. In addition, she sometimes gets snippy with him for no reason. For example, if he asks her something in response to something she said, she’ll say “No, you don’t listen!” and then correct him... but simply says synonyms for what he said. So basically, he was correct to begin with, but she yelled at him anyway, as if he was wrong, and repeated what he said (but using different words). Since she lives independently and still remembers simple things like where she lives and people’s names, is that a sign of MILD dementia/Alzheimer’s?

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  • sasha
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Dementia can present in many different ways for different people.

    If she forgets some things, that could be mild dementia, could be she just forgot (everyone forgets things).

    Since it is words that are the issue, it could be aphasia.

  • 4 weeks ago

    First off....WE ALL FORGET THINGS!

    When we are 35 and cannot find our car keys, we simply write it off to forgetting where we put them.

    When we are 65 and cannot find our car keys, we believe we have Alzheimer's Disease or another form of dementia.  but its the same thing.

    I read your question with a lot of interest and I see that there is more conflicting going on between mother and son than there is a problem with dementia.

    I see that the 65 year old woman is trying to defend herself to her son.  She is getting older but is living independently and successfully.  She resents his intrusion into her world and his attempts to minimize her or make her look old and forgetful.

    I would tell this son to approach his mother differently and with more support and encouragement for the way she lives.  She is doing a lot right.  She doesn't need his constant criticism of her.

    Maybe the son should just stay away if he cannot be supportive.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Dementia is a slow progression.

    65 is fairly young.

    Simple memory lapses can occur for anyone and are not a sign of dementia.

    Getting annoyed by adult children can also happen to anyone.

  • martin
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Someone that age definitely can have dementia and Alzheimer's. Usually people that age do not have that just yet.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Yes, it sounds like something is DEFINITELY wrong with the son.

    I question why a person with a 65-year old mother does't MOVE OUT.

    • Amaretta
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      There wasn't anything in his question that suggested that he lives with her.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    It would be unusually young but not impossible. 

  • Idk, maybe. Go to a neurologist or psychiatrist

  • A.J.
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Dementia is a broad term and there is severity and progression. Forgetfulness is not enough to categorize dementia. A sign of dementia is for example:

    We need eggs.

    Reply: There's a dozen in the refrigerator.

    10 minutes later.

    Can you go out and get eggs. I'm out of eggs.

    Reply: There's a dozen eggs in the refrigerator. I brought them yesterday.

    No there isn't. 

    Reply: Go check. They're in your refrigerator.

    10 minutes later.

    Can you bring me a dozen eggs when you stop by tomorrow? I ran out.

    What you describe can be a start of dementia, and driving is a problem because she could get to a place and forget where the car is, or how to get back. GPS can help, but she can forget how it works.

    Anger is frustration normally. When a person gets that way, ignore the anger.

  • 4 weeks ago

    only a doctor can tell her that so she needs to go see one

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