Where did all the energy and matter for the "big bang" originate from? Did they already exist or created by something that already existed?

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  • 4 weeks ago
    Favorite Answer

    They were "pre-existing" conditions!

    Similar to the famous text that says "The Spirit of God hovered over the deep and God saw that it was with out form".

    Just as the deep is a pre-existing condition, so were mass and energy that scientists refer to.

    The Bible model places the source of the energy as from God and the mass from the "deep".

    The models are very much alike, only the terms and suggested time frames are different.

    • Al4 weeks agoReport

      Ole Man Dirt, Thanks! I have been researching this for several weeks now and I believe that your answer reveals the most overall wisdom.  It integrates the traditionally historical account with the current modern concepts of quantum physics.  Excellent answer!

  • 4 weeks ago

    one can make an entirely rational suggestion of vast creative intelligence driving this whole set up,from,the rules that elements follow,from each atom,electron,,their outer shells,in every crook nanny and corner of the universe,,which rules properties,and make up we are still discovering,all in creation,time/space,the contents of 'the rapid expansion' had a point of origin,we next ask,did dumb innate particles somehow agree after conferring on how they would act as a whole

  • 4 weeks ago

    Matter comes from energy. E = mc^2

    The total energy in the universe is zero because there is positive energy from mass and kinetic energy and heat energy and there is negative gravitational potential energy. They exactly cancel each other for a zero total. Amazing how clever nature is.

    • Al4 weeks agoReport

      Interesting theory, however, if we assume everything cancels out, this might explain how everything may end, now that everything's already here.  The existance of two opposing entities doesn't explain how they originated out of nothingness.  It's more logical to assume something already existed.

  • cosmo
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    It's quite likely that the total energy content of the Big Bang is zero.  Gravitational potential energy is negative, and could have supplied all the positive energy needed to make all the "stuff".  If you add all the positive and negative together you get zero.  No net energy is needed.

    • Al4 weeks agoReport

      Thanks, Cosmo & Hoarseman. Gravitational or electromagnetic energy requires a mass.  Regarding positive and negative energies, if their origin is the same, then their close proximity would have resulted in immediate self annihilation.  Energy cannot originate within an infinite space of nothingness.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    It all started with a Battle between Captain Underpants and Pippy P Poopy Pants, who changed his name to save embarrassment

    He became Tippy T Tinkletrousers and tried to destroy Matter by exploding an Antimatter Bomb helped by Bionic Barf Bunnies

     The resulting turmoil Caused a Singularity which couldn't take all that extra Matter and became a Great Splodge

    Not a Big Bang as previously said

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    • Al4 weeks agoReport

      Thanks. It is an entertaining and funny perspective, Ronald 7.  I wonder what thoughts would float through your mind seven seconds prior to your death.

  • 4 weeks ago

    I'll lean towards the universe and the laws of physics that govern it had a supernatural creator.

    • Al4 weeks agoReport

      I am concluding that something tangible had to have already infinitely existed.  If it's a creator, then we can at least gain a remarkable benefit that none of the other solutions offer, and that is "hope."  Hope is a powerful force propelling us towards whatever comes after life is terminated.

  • 4 weeks ago

    I suspect most people accept that the energy that went into our (pocket) universe already existed -- in an energy field of some kind  -- but the primal  origins of that energy will always be unknowable .

  • 4 weeks ago

    No body around to say, but certainly one mind staggering amount of energy.

    One theory I have is what we call the singularity, may compare to a black hole with all the mass in the universe. That could amount to a lot of energy stored away packed into this singularity. Maybe not unlike a 2 pound ball of uranium compressed to critical mass, it releases a tremendous amount of energy. One little electron goes into motion in this singularity and a chain reaction starts, and bang, All this matter and energy released into this infinite void. The notion it is still expanding. Even reactions since like novas and chaos. Mass attracts mass and forms stars and their motions set up the dynamics that form our universe as we know it.

    Something I summed after reading tons of papers and scientific journals on the subject. Then spot something strange while cutting metal with a torch, I see all these little balls of metal splatter on the floor and move in a very like fashion as forming galaxies and solar systems. Spinning clusters of metal reminds me of looking at time laps animation of many galaxies.

    Just a hunch and notion with all this, every individual will have their own hunch and notion.

    As for before that, might be a previous universe, ultimately collapsed into this singularity and the process repeats. Understand, we, as observers are a short lived speck in relation to XYZ,and T dimensions.

    • Al4 weeks agoReport

      Thank you, Daniel, for such deep thinking comments! I believe this question is at the convergence of physics, philosophy & theology.  Because the true answer may never be revealed to us, humans, perhaps the best answer is to believe it happened in such a way as to render some benefit to humankind, 

  • 4 weeks ago

    This is an unknown, but many consider that this universe is a subset of some other material or whatever word would be used to describe the "precursor" thing that is not this universe.  The universe is, in effect, a result of some sort of segregation out of some other unified totality (which obliges that the remainder of that segregation process either also formed a universe, or became somewhat excessive in the original "thing").  That is, there is mass-energy equivalent that would negate all that is this universe, which has to be somewhere not in this universe.  If this universe encounters that negative mass-energy whatever it is, it would be a neutralization of sorts that would make this universe return into the state that was the totality before the segregation process ever happened.  I use time senses even if time has no meaning for the discussion, simply because we lack a way to express things otherwise.

    That is about the closest I can come to explaining what has to be. it is a long-winded way of saying 0=1+ -1, and if our universe is the 1, then there must be a -1 somewhere, because we came from the partition of a 0 net sum.

    • Al4 weeks agoReport

      Actually, busterwasmycat, your explanation makes some sense to me, except there must have been some entity that initiated the process to begin with.  Perhaps the precursor was not a material per sae but an invisible "director" of sorts, considering the vast quantity of undiscovered things invisible.

  • 4 weeks ago

    The Big Bang Theory only theorizes that the "singularity" upon which the Big Bang acted contained all of that matter and energy.

    It does not attempt to theorize the origin of that matter and energy, nor does it even attempt to theorize *if* said matter and energy had an origin. (I.e. possibly it could have always existed.)

    Some physicists *have* proposed explanations for an origin of said matter and energy. I don't know if such explanations have been classified as "theories", there being (I would guess) too little evidence to support them.

    • Al4 weeks agoReport

      Thanks for your logical comments.

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