I have an old (at least 15 years) Nikon Speedlight SB-800 work with a Nikon D7000 Camera?

Update:

I WOULD LIKE TO THANK EVERYONE FOR RESPONDING TO MY INTENDED QUESTION.  I REALIZED AFTER THE FACT, THAT MY INTENDED QUESTION WAS NOT A QUESTION..LOL..SO, I SHALL ASK IT PROPERLY!  ALL OF THE RESPONSES WERE INSIGHTFUL AND HELPFUL.

WILL THE NIKON SPEEDLIGHT SB-800 FLASH WORK WITH A NIKON D7000 CAMERA? 

7 Answers

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    Yes it will with the camera in manual mode. Don't expect TTL to work.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Yes, the SB-800 was the first high-end model to use the iTTL flash control, which is what your D7000 uses. Everything before that was D-TTL, and will not work in TTL mode on your camera. There are no issues with voltage or flash control between the two.

  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    The SB800 was only released in 2008, so it isn't that old, and seems to be compatible with the D70, so I suggest you try it.

  • qrk
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    It will work. My SB600 works on my D7000 and D500. The SB800 is a better flash than the SB600. Your manual should show flash compatibility. If you don't have the manual, download from Nikon's web site.

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  • Frank
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Yes, every single SB-xxx will work with any DSLR ever made by Nikon.  The difference is that you may not get all of the features that either the flash or body is capable of doing.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Maybe yes, maybe no. Some older flashes have very high voltage at the camera hot shoe contacts. It was not a problem on older film cameras, but can destroy a modern digital camera. Modern day flashes designed to work with digital cameras have very low voltage at the hot shoe contacts. There are charts online that show the voltages of various flash units, old and new. You can find such charts easily enough on Google by searching such terms as "Flash hot shoe voltage". Most modern flashes for digital cameras will be no higher than 6 volts. Older flashes can be as much as 200 volts, so you can see how that could ruin a camera not designed for that.

    So just do research on your flash. It may be fully compatible with the D7000, but you better be SURE before using it.

    • Caoedhen
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      This was a Canon issue, not a general digital issue. Other makers may have followed suit by now, but this whole voltage thing was started with the EOS 300D. Nikon was still using 250 volts at the time.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Not sure what your question is but if they're both operational you have a nice setup to learn the fundamentals of photography.

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