Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceRenting & Real Estate · 4 weeks ago

I rented an apartment and was allowed to have a cat.  Now my landlord is ordering me to get rid of my cat?

I pay an extra $25/month to have a cat.  The downstairs neighbor says the cat is bothering her allergies.  I don't see how someone in a different unit can have any allergy issues with my cat.  

I told him we could do a cash for keys arrangement and I'll move out, but he says he isn't letting me out of the lease.  He's just revoking my permission to have a cat.

I read the lease and it only says that an animal that bites someone or is dangerous or vicious can be ordered to be removed.  He says this falls under the "dangerous" category.

What should I do?  I'm not abandoning my cat and I'm not going to continue to pay rent if I have to move out. 

13 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    You didn't mention if your cat is an indoor cat or also goes outside. If the cat goes outside, I guess I could see how this could stir up the other tenant's allergies. I can't see it if your cats is just an indoor cat. I personally think cats are safest staying inside anyway, because so many people hate cats. I am a cat lover & kept my cat inside where she was also much cleaner, and I didn't have to worry about her getting hit by a car. I'm assuming your cat must go outside & hangs around your neighbor's place like cats can do. Your neighbor could just be a cat hater & claiming she's allergic to cats. I know people who just say they're allergic to them because they don't like them. I don't see how anyone can't like them. Perhaps if your cat goes outside you can ask the landlord if you can stay if you keep it inside. You were told you could have your beloved cat, and there's no way I'd want to get rid of my cat. It's not fair, and plus you were willing to pay $25.00 extra per month. I would consult an attorney if you can to see what you can do. Why isn't the neighbor who claims an allergy asked to move? Why must it be you that has to move or to have to get rid of your cat?

  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    You have a written contract which allows you to have a cat, so if the landlord follows through on this the landlord is in breach of contract.... you have offered to leave make sure you put this offer in writing so you can prove the offer you made......... the landlord would have to take you to court for the court to decide however it is very unlikely they would get an eviction against you based on someone elses 'allergy' who lives in another place and they would be required to be in court as well........

  • 4 weeks ago

    The other tenant's allergies do not trump contract law. Your lease allows you to have a cat by paying a monthly fee, which you have done. The landlord will be in breach of the contract if they try to enforce their illegal changing of the rules mid-lease.  If the landlord tries to evict you, go to court with a copy of your lease and documentation of paying the pet fees and you will win.  You'll have to move when the lease expires.

  • R P
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    You do not have to rehome your cat ... yet. You are permitted to have it per your current lease.

    However! You landlord can change the terms of your lease at renewal time. Most likely he will either choose not to renew your lease, or he will not permit your cat any longer.

    My advice is to be sure you have the necessary monies needed to move when your lease expires.

    Source(s): Florida landlord
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  • 4 weeks ago

    Let him try and file for eviction based on this...go to court...bring your lease.  Your landlord has no argument here...

    The Landlord is trying to pressure you to help the other tenant, so I wouldn't go crazy thinking they are automatically a bad person (they might be, but clearly sympathetic at least to the other tenant).  

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    The lease says you can have a cat.  Tell the landlord that if the other tenant's pet allergies are "dangerous" to her health, she should not have moved into a pet-friendly building.   She has endangered her own health by not selecting an appropriate living situation.    That's her problem, not your problem.

    There are no sane judges who would determine that your cat meets the intended definition of "dangerous".   If the cat is "dangerous", it would be dangerous to all tenants, not just her. 

    If he tried to evict you in Judge Milian's or Judge Judy's court room, they'd eat him for lunch and spit out his bones on live TV.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      Surely you know that Judge Milian and Judge Judy are not actually presiding over adjudication of actual cases.  They are simply actors performing mediation, and all parties get paid by the producers, regardless of the decision.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Tell him the lease works both ways.  The lease says you can have a cat.  If he's not willing to let you out of the lease, you're not willing to let him out of it either.  

  • 4 weeks ago

    If it was in your contract that you can have one, you're grandfathered in and they can't tell you to get rid of it. Contact legal aid on this (they're free). You're within your rights to have the cat.

    Unless your cat is in the other apartment, they can't be reacting to allergen from your animal.

  • P
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Tell him it's in your lease and he can't change it anymore than you can get out of it.  Tell him he's more than welcome to take you to court and ask a judge if he's allowed to change an executed contract if he doesn't want to take your word for it. 

  • 4 weeks ago

    Her allergies are not your problem. You have a lease that says you can have the cat? Then you can have the cat.

    He cannot just revoke part of a written contract. Does not at all work like that. The animal is not dangerous. Tell him if he think that will fly in court, to go ahead and go that route. You'll win, he knows it.

    You do not get rid of the cat OR move out. HE wants to change the terms of the lease, HE can compensate you for that change in some way. Your suggestion makes the most sense.

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