Eric asked in EnvironmentGlobal Warming · 1 month ago

Do you think coral atolls disappear with rising sea levels? How then did they cope with previous dramatic sea level rises? See study below.?

Sea level rise may not drown low-lying Pacific atolls 

https://www.scimex.org/newsfeed/sea-level-rise-may... fish!

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  • JimZ
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    No.  Corals can easily accommodate the sea level rise with growth.  Any warming tends to help corals build their reefs because calcium carbonate from which it is made is less soluble in warm water.  There is some compensation for that in increased carbonic acid making it slightly less alkaline but the increased CO2 helps corals with their primary food which is photosynthesis from their symbiotic algae they hold within their bodies.  The photosynthesis actually powers the removal of carbonates enabling them to grow even faster and easily keep up with any foreseeable sea level rise.   Sea levels, like climate, have never been stable.  Corals are very adaptable to varying conditions as are their zooanthallae symbionts.  

    The headline is misleading.  Corals obviously won't drown.  If for example a coral broke off a shallow portion of the reef and landed in a deeper portion, it wouldn't necessarily die.  It would likely expel its zooanthallae and try they try to acquire different ones that were adapted to the new conditions.  

    • JimZ
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      The solubility of calcite and other crystal forms of CaC03 in pure water decreases somewhat as the temperature rises 

  • 1 month ago

    For one thing, Earth's temperature is rising much faster than it has for most of the past. As a result, sea level rise can be expected to rise much faster than it has in the past. And, in the past, when the temperature went up, oceans released carbon dioxide and became more alkaline. Since the current warming is due to carbon dioxide, this time oceans are absorbing carbon dioxide and the pH is dropping.

    • JimZ
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Earth's temperature is relatively stable, certainly compared to many other times in the Earth's history.  Your fastest rise would be invisible blip in far more significant rise and falls in the past.    

  • oikoσ
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    As sea levels rise, the reefs build upward. Besides, sea level rise has been slower in the past. It is "dramatic" only in geological terms, not historic ones.

    • Eric1 month agoReport

      I find the impact of the Parrot fish incredible. Many reef areas are making them protected because of how they support reef maintenance.

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