Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 3 weeks ago

Is this a correct inversion: “Through the air wafts a breeze the smell of roses.”?

7 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    When you have two different noun phrases ("a breeze" "the smell of roses") you need some punctuation or connecting word between them. You don't say I'm having spaghetti coffee ice cream for dinner, unless it's an unusual flavor of ice cream. So you need some word like "and" or "with" between "a breeze" and "the smell."

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    No, that's not an inversion at all.

    • dgktk
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      Make your answer complete, would you?

  • RP
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    You might add "with" before "the" in order to eliminate any doubt.

  • 3 weeks ago

    No; you can't just follow 'a breeze' with 'the smell of roses'. There is no structure to the sentence.

    You could say: 'Through the air wafts a breeze bearing the scent of roses', or 'Through the air wafts the scent of roses, carried on a breeze'.

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  • 3 weeks ago

    Wrong at so many levels, a waft of roses, or a smell of roses, will do.

    • dgktk
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      If you don’t have the knowledge just stop answering the questions 

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Something isn't right.  

    Through the air wafts a breeze smelling of roses. Through the air wafts a rose-scented breeze.

    At a pinch you might have:

    “Through the air wafts a breeze, the smell of roses.”

  • Rick B
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    "the scent of roses" would work with that wording, but not the smell.

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