Is it possible the earth is moving farther from the sun and the experts are just not telling us?

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  • 3 weeks ago

    No, that is not possible for a variety of reasons. Here are just a few:

    The earth's orbit is determined by Newton's laws; there nothing to cause this to happen.

    If the earth was moving farther from the sun - all other things being equal - the earth should be getting cooler.

    By Kepler's Laws if the earth was moving farther from the sun the period of the earth's orbit around the sun, i.e. the length of the year, would be increasing. It this was the case It is not only "experts" who would notice.

    What motive would these "experts" have to keep this a secret and how would they do so successfully without a single whistle blower breaking ranks?

    • Tom S
      Lv 7
      2 weeks agoReport

      You could argue with the folks at Cornell, if you want, .........http://curious.astro.cornell.edu/ask-a-question/41-our-solar-system/the-earth/orbit/83-is-the-distance-from-the-earth-to-the-sun-changing-advanced

  • Joe
    Lv 5
    3 weeks ago

    Trump would tell us.  He is all about science. 

    • Tom S
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      No he would tweet about it, then sign an executive order.

  • 3 weeks ago

    Right now we are traveling towards Earth's Perihelion in the Northern Winter

     That is part of the reason Antarctica is Colder

    Plus being surrounded by the Southern ocean

    Attachment image
  • 3 weeks ago

    E = m c^2

    The Sun's luminosity is the result of over 4 million tonnes of mass being lost (turned into energy) every second, in the Sun.

    (1) If Earth's orbital energy remains constant, then as the central mass keeps getting less, the orbital radius must increase.

    (2) On the other hand, orbiting acceleration does remove some orbital energy from the Earth-Sun system, energy that leaves as gravitational waves. However, in the case of Earth, this is very small: 300 Joules per second (the equivalent of 300 Watts).

    (1) is greater than (2), even though both are extremely small. The long-term average increase in Earth's orbital radius is calculated to be in millimetres per century - way too small to be measurable with present instruments.

    There are short-term effects which are much greater. Over the long run, they more-or-less balance themselves out (otherwise, we would have been flung from the Solar system billions of years ago). Most of these effects are from the giant planets (especially Jupiter, with Saturn having a smaller but yet measurable effect). Because of that effect, the average orbital distance Earth-Sun can change by a bit more than 500 km from year-to-year, sometimes moving away, sometimes getting closer. Some years, the change is less. But, more importantly, over long periods, these effects cancel out. In 2019, we are moving away from the Sun at the rate of 550 km per year (approx.).

    The orbit of Earth is often represented (for simplicity) as an ellipse, with a point when Earth is closest to the Sun (perihelion) and one where we are furthest (aphelion).  This ellipse is really a statistical average over a long period. Every year, the path we follow around the Sun is not exactly the same (mostly because of the effect described above).

    In 2019, the extreme values were:

    perihelion 147,099,761 km (January 3, 2019)

    aphelion 152 104 285 km (July 4)

    In 2020, they will be:

    perihelion 147,091,144 km (January 5, 2020)aphelion 152 095 295 km (July 4)

    To further complicate things, what determines Earth's orbit around the Sun is really the Earth-Moon system. It is the "barycentre" (the centre of mass) of the system that follows the smooth path around the Sun. Each month, the Earth wobbles by over 4,000 km, sometimes further away from the Sun (at New Moon), sometimes towards the Sun (at Full Moon).

    • YKhan
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      Excellent insight! A few things that even i didn't know!

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  • 3 weeks ago

    Earth does all kinds of crazy stuff orbiting around the sun. It isn't a perfect circle, it is a tad elliptical. This means a Perihelion and Aphelion.

    A list of this 3 million mile change:

          Date/year     Perihelion Distance       Date/Year    Aphelion DistanceJanuary 2, 2019    91,403,554 mi           July 4, 2019    94,513,221 miJanuary 5, 2020    91,398,199 mi           July 4, 2020    94,507,635 miJanuary 2, 2021    91,399,454 mi           July 5, 2021    94,510,886 miJanuary 4, 2022    91,406,842 mi           July 4, 2022    94,509,598 miJanuary 4, 2023    91,403,034 mi           July 6, 2023    94,506,364 mi* All aphelion/perihelion times are in local Dallas time.

    If you get he gist here, Earth at the moment, is getting closer.

    This stretches and shrinks also with where the other planets are located in their orbits.

    This changes the exact time by several hours.

    So give or take a kilometer, we know exactly where the earth is.

    No secret at all,,it is the science behind it.

  • 3 weeks ago

    Or closer. Or some other cataclysmic event is afoot. I have wondered that lately. But with a planet filled with astronomers, it's highly unlikely that anyone would be able to keep that a secret, scifi movies notwithstanding.

  • Tom S
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    It most definitely is and the experts have told us, not by very much, and over very long time spans.

    • Tom S
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      You must be looking at some other link, or confused.

  • 3 weeks ago

    I doubt it, because a more distant and elliptical orbit 

    would be negating (offsetting) some of the natural 

    global warming that is taking place. 

  • 3 weeks ago

    Earth's orbit goes through cycles over millions of years.  Some are by distance only (larger or smaller).  Some are by shape (less round and more round, or more extreme ellipses).  Those are caused by eccentricity.  The other planets (but mostly Jupiter) tug on Earth and each other.  That changes the orbits over time.

  • 3 weeks ago

    Well, at the moment - we're moving *closer* to the sun day by day... we'll be at our closest approach early in January 2020, then we'll start moving further out once again.

    • Tom S
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      Undetectable for one years difference with current astronometry technology, sure, but measurable over many years, and a physical inevitably, not possiblity.  The Sun looses mass to energy emitted.

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