Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsEngineering · 4 weeks ago

why do brake pad and rotor always touch each other?

when u spin the wheel without a calliper it spins many revolutions but if u put the calliper back and spin it only goes 1 or half a revolution because pad and rotor are always touching. 

Why cant engineering make somethiing to separate the pad and rotor for better fuel economy

4 Answers

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  • 4 weeks ago

    The pads and rotors are supposed to touch. This is so the rotors stay wiped clean from water, mud, etc., and so there isn't a little noise every time you step on the brake. The effect on gas mileage is very minimal.

  • 4 weeks ago

    BECAUSE IT IS THE LIMITATION FROM MECHANICAL DEVICE THAT RUNNING ON GASOLINE POWER CAR, ELECTRIC CAR CAN USE A BETTER WAY TO BRAKE THE CAR BY REVERSING THE ELECTRIC MOTOR POWER SOURCE AT THE SAME TIME WHILE BRAKING, RATHER THAN USING A SET BRAKE PADS.

  • 4 weeks ago

    If everything is working right - and once the pads are "bedded in" and any loose bits worn away - the pads should pull clear of the discs by a tiny amount.

    The pads are retained by small pressed steel spring clips. They allow the pads to move and spring back again within a small range, but push through the caliper as the pads wear down.

    There are many designs, varying from make to make and model to model. This is an example - you can see the spring clips on the "ears" on the pad ends.

    https://alternativecarparts.co.uk/wp-content/uploa...

    If the pads are not clearing once bedded in, something is not fitted right, the pad clips are faulty or the piston(s) is/are sticking.

    The piston(s) also give a similar elastic retraction effect as the seals either deform or slide, depending on the overall movement when the brakes are applied.

    • oil field trash
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      If the brakes cut fuel economy they would have done something all ready. They are always looking for anything to increase the MPG

  • 4 weeks ago

    Like many engineering issues, it takes someone to ask these questions, then come up with a solution... could that be you?

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