Why can't septic tanks be connected to public sewer?

15 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Sewer is a gravity fed system. So is septic. If you stayed hooked up to septic, - the "solids" would just fill that tank to the brim and back up into the house. Your tank holds 600 to 1000 gallons of TURDS and then it is packed solid. The sewer holds 26,000,000,000gallons(=/- a Billion) meaning it never gets full.  They take out the solids and those go to a composting site where it is mixed with sawdust and composted into SOIL, which you buy for your gardens.  Yeah, you pay to get rid of your turds then later on you buy your processed turd as fertilizer for your lawns.  Not for food production.   Maybe they may find a way to pour it in your gas tank for your Turd transporter.  Or make into batteries? So that is why they bypass your system, which over time decays...and falls apart.  Which is WHY YOU CAN DUMP JUNK IN THERE TO FILL UP THE TANK, after you first MT it it is an MT concrete vat so when they close the lid and it does collapse some years down the road, when you park the Batmobile over it, no one will fall into PooVille.    Now your backyard is open to planting more trees...or parking...or a workshop can be put anywhere as the drainage tiles are not being used anymore.

  • 1 month ago

    hello, I believe it has to do with the hydraulics required for a public sewer. The line leaving the house has to have a certain slope to assure drainage. Since the septic tank is all ready in the ground you can't get the necessary slope to the sewer main in the street.

    • Anon4 weeks agoReport

      my tank was just under surface on a 1.000 foot hill .Higher than my well and water table. 

  • 1 month ago

    Because septic tanks connect to a drain field. Just re-route the septic input pipe to the sewer.

  • 1 month ago

    Why bother? You'd just be asking for trouble with no benefit.

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  • 1 month ago

    I believe it has to do with the hydraulics required for a public sewer. The line leaving the house has to have a certain slope to assure drainage. Since the septic tank is all ready in the ground you can't get the necessary slope to the sewer main in the street.

  • y
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Excellent question and it appears, like myself, that most don't actually know the reason, I'm thinking it has something to do with the system not being a sealed system. Which could mean that in the event of an issue in the sewer lines, it could back up and overflow a septic system. Which to me, would be preferable to it backing up into houses. But that is just a guess.

  • 1 month ago

    the bacteria in the tank aren't highly compatible with those used in the public treatment plant

  • 1 month ago

    Well, in most cases, it's because there is no public sewer to connect it to. And if there was a public sewer, you wouldn't need a septic tank.

  • 1 month ago

    Because bacteria need time to do their work. There are septic tanks that work with an overflow system where raw sewage gets treated in 3 or more phases. The result is mostly water which then gets put in the sewer.

  • Brian
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Because you don't understand the difference.

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