can I claim my 38 year old stepson on my taxes as he didn't work?

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Maybe.

    If he provided over half his own "support" (food, clothing, medical care, housing, etc.), then no.

    If he didn't live with you and you didn't provide over half his "support" (food, clothing, medical care, housing, etc.), then no.

    If he didn't live with you and he had too much income (even though it wasn't from work), then no.

    If he wasn't disabled and he had too much income (even though it wasn't from work), then no.

    If he lived with you and was permanently and totally disabled, then maybe.

    If you provided over half his "support" (food, clothing, medical care, housing, etc.), then maybe.

    If he lived with you and was permanently and totally disabled, and you provided over half his "support" (food, clothing, medical care, housing, etc.), then probably.

    • NA
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      For a 38 year old, the test is the taxpayer provides more than half.  You gave the support test for a qualified CHILD.

  • 4 weeks ago

    If you support him you are entitled to the $500 credit for an "other relative."

  • 4 weeks ago

    Maybe.

    If he meets the rules for a qualifying relative, then yes.

    Note that step son is a valid relationship - Relationships created by marriage (aka "step" relationships) are recognized equally to biological relationships for tax purposes. So you can treat your step son as though he was your biological son for purposes of any required relationship in the federal tax code.

  • Judy
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    If you supported him you can

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  • 4 weeks ago

    If he did not work at all, lived with you all year, etc, then sure.

    • NA
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      A stepson would NOT have to live with the taxpayer.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Who Qualifies as a Dependent on Your Tax Return? | The ...

    https://blog.turbotax.intuit.com › tax-deductions-and-credits-2 › family

    1. The person must either be a relative or a member of your household. The category of relatives is broad, and includes:

    your child, adopted child, step child, foster child, or their descendents, such as your grandchild descendant of any of them (for example, your grandchild) if they are not considered your “qualifying child”

    your brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, or stepsister, or their descendents

    your father, mother, stepfather, stepmother, grandparent, or other ancestor

    a brother or sister of your father or mother, or

    your son-in-law, daughter-in-law, father-in-law, mother-in-law, brother-in-law, or sister-in-law, but only while the marriage exists, not after it ends in death or divorce.

    2. The person’s taxable income must be less than $3,900 (this goes up every year).

    3. You must pay for more than half the person’s support during the year, unless the person is supported by several people who all agree in a multiple support agreement that you can claim the exemption.

  • 4 weeks ago

    You can claim any person that you want that lives within your household that you have provided more than 50% of their support. or if a person does not live with you and you're providing all of their support you can claim them as a dependent. As long as they do not claim themselves on their income tax return

    • NA
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      A son doesn't have to live with the taxpayer.

  • marty
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    If he is living there, and you are caring for him and supporting him, and you provide over 50% of his support and he's not paying rent. Then YES, you can claim him 

    • NA
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      The son doesn't have to live with the taxpayer.

  • 4 weeks ago

    If you give more than half his support.

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