Nigel asked in PetsReptiles · 4 weeks ago

Anyone know what kind of snake this is I found it in my basement I live in Maryland ?

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  • 3 weeks ago

    A harmless juvenile eastern ratsnake. It is probably this year's hatchling. These snakes are not venomous, and they are pretty docile. Many people keep ratsnakes as pets since they can be easily fed with mice. They eat small mammals, lizards and birds in the wild. The eastern United States is going to have a cold spell. The snake can freeze to death if it cannot find a suitable place to hide. You may want to keep it in a box with ventilation holes and keep it in a place where temperatures won't fall below freezing but won't be above 70 deg. F. You can then release it in the spring, when it warms up again. If you do not want to do that, you should wait at least until the cold spell is over to release it. It is probably looking for a place to hibernate, and found your basement. It is not going to need any food or warmth in the mean time, as long as it is kept above freezing temperatures and below 70 deg. F.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    A harmless juvenile eastern ratsnake. It is probably this year's hatchling. These snakes are not venomous, and they are pretty docile. Many people keep ratsnakes as pets since they can be easily fed with mice.  They eat small mammals, lizards and birds in the wild. The eastern United States is going to have a cold spell. The snake can freeze to death if it cannot find a suitable place to hide. You may want to keep it in a box with ventilation holes and keep it in a place where temperatures won't fall below freezing but won't be above 70 deg. F. You can then release it in the spring, when it warms up again. If you do not want to do that, you should wait at least until the cold spell is over to release it.  It is probably looking for a place to hibernate, and found your basement. It is not going to need any food or warmth in the mean time, as long as it is kept above freezing temperatures and below 70 deg. F.

  • 4 weeks ago

    I can't see the snake clearly the picture is too small take a look at this picture this is a diamondback rattlesnake. If it looks like this you better stay away from it

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    • oikoσ
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      Before posting the rattler picture, you should have noticed that the snake in question has smooth scales; those of a rattler are strongly keeled.

  • TB12
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    I think a bigger concern would be how did a snake get into my basement to begin with,, if there's one there's probably more.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Always be careful with snakes, obviously, even non-poisonous ones can hurt if they bite.

    I googled “common snakes in Maryland” and hit the images button, came up with a couple different types of rattlers as well as a milksnake.  I suggest you google and look at images since you have the snake on hand to compare.  

    Even baby rattlers have rattles, I’ve seen lots of them.  Milksnakes will pretend to be rattlers if they feel threatened.  Rattlers tend to have wider, more distinctive heads than other snakes.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Does it rattle?  Does it have fangs?

    • Nigel4 weeks agoReport

      No it does not have a rattle or fangs 

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