Recieved a letter from the IRS about money owed?

In 2017, my husband and I filed taxes using turbo tax. Now its 2019. Husband is now ex husband and I recieved a notice CP22A in the mail stating "Changes to your 2017 form 1040A" and a balance owed of $7806.25. I called someone at the IRS who said that in 2017, there were two W2s that we didn't file. The person then said that i need to request an "AUR re-determination" and then gave me a number to an automated system that doesn't even help. I'm wondering - could we just file the missing W2s and be done with it? And how would it work now that ex and I are no longer together? 

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  • 4 weeks ago

    You can file an amended return sure, that will still result in you owing money. Maybe not as much as they say you do, but you will still owe.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    They know you earned money and did not pay the taxes owed. So they want you to refile and pay what you owe. Plus interest and penalties.

    One time way back when I made a minor error on my state taxes. They sent a letter saying send them so much, it was a small amount so I did it.

  • 4 weeks ago

    No, you cannot simply "file those 2 W2 forms" as a new return and be done with it.

    If the IRS calculations are correct then you need to pay the debt. If you think the IRS calculations are incorrect then you can track down your ex-husband, file an amended joint return showing what your tax return SHOULD have looked like in the first place, then you'll owe the difference. This would work the same way as it would have if you discovered the mistake while you were still married - you prepare the amended return, both of you sign it, and you send it to the IRS. It does not matter if you are married right now - you were married on 12/31/17 and you filed a joint return, so your tax records for 2017 are forever linked together.

    But its highly unlikely that the IRS miscalculated your amount owed. So really all that's left to do is mail them a check or set up a payment plan. You and your Ex can split the debt however you want, and if you can't agree then you can take him to court over the matter - the IRS will not get involved in that part of the issue.

  • 4 weeks ago

    IRS has already added the income from the two missing W-2's to the equation. If that is accurate there is nothing to redetermine. If you filed a joint return then you are both equally liable for the tax and 20% penalty. The real question here is why were the two W-2's left off the original filing?

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Even if you file the missing W-2's, you will still need to pay the tax you owe; you won't be "done with it".

  • Judith
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    You obviously don't understand - the IRS ALREADY HAS THOSE W2 forms provided by the employers - that's why they now know that income wasn't included in your joint tax return.  The problem is that they were not included when your tax returns were filed and so the amount of taxes due the IRS was incorrect.  Either the preparer screwed up or you or your husband didn't give the preparer the W2 forms to begin with.

    If the W2 forms were your husband's employers I'd file an appeal with the IRS and tell them they should be getting the taxes which are owed from your husband.  If you bothered to read the notice from the IRS in its entirety it told you what to do if you disagreed with the letter.

    If one or both of the W2 forms were from YOUR employers, I'd make arrangements with the IRS to pay taxes owed on an installment basis.  Agree to pay 50% of tax owed; let your ex pay the other 50%.

    You will also owe the state once the federal issue is resolved.

    My ex-fiance's ex-wife prepared their income tax returns and efiled them.  He trusted her to do them right.  Problem is they ended up owing the IRS $11,000.  I suggested he file an appeal stating that she filed the returns which he didn't sign.  The notice from the IRS said they had already contacted his ex and she said she couldn't afford to pay the tax which was why they were contacting him.  She had an appointment for a face lift.  He included that info his in appeal - said if she could afford a face lift she could afford to pay the tax.  His appeal was approved.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Unfiled W2's means undeclared income. So they must already know about them if they are asking for your taxes. You were married at the time, that is all that maters, the tax laws and your marital status in 2017 are what maters. I would call them back and ask for more advice on how to rectify the situation.

  • Eva
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    That's not how it works. You would have to file a joint amended return. If the IRS is correct about how much you owe, then you don't need to file the amended return. Be aware though that if the federal return is wrong, so it the state. You each are equally liable for the amount. You will need an accountant to determine how much of the liability actually belongs to each person, and then explain your options to you. That's a lot to owe. Hard to believe that you didn't realize there were W2s missing for that amount of income.

    • STEVEN F
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      Actually, it is EASY to believe that if the husband handle the money, the wife had no idea if the tax returns were accurate.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Assuming a joint return was filed in 2017, you are both liable for the amount due and they can GENERALLY collect from either of you without attempting to collect from the other.

    It is POSSIBLE you can get partial relief under by claiming 'injured spouse' status. Contact a tax attorney to determine if that applies.

    Based on my admittedly limited understanding of the rules, I suspect you will be on the hook with the IRS for at least half of the balance. Once you pay, you can TRY to collect from your ex-husband.

    Again, you should consult an attorney to determine your specific status. The only other potentially viable option is just paying the amount they say you owe.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    If the IRS has  both addresses, you should both get the same letter.

    On a joint return, you are each liable for every $ owed.  The IRS will try to collect from each of you until the balance is paid.  There is no my half/his half.  (Another thing posters routinely get wrong.)

    You can file the Innocent Spouse form, but there is no guarantee it will be granted.  (Note, ignore anyone who says to file Injured Spouse.  That is a form for debts BEFORE marriage.)Prior to the bill, a CP2000 letter would have been sent out indicating that 2 W-2s that match either your SSN, your spouse's SSN  (or one for each of you) were overlooked.  If the W-2s did not belong to you (say identity theft), that was the time to speak up.When no one replied to that letter (or agreed that the W-2s were legitimate), the IRS reran the numbers and come up with the new tax bill (less any new withholding) and billed the two of you for the difference, interest and failure to pay penalties.  (If your tax return was filed late, failure to file penalties, too.)  The amount can be high if your original tax return claimed, for example, EIC and with the correct income, you were longer entitled to it.  Unless this has happened before, I doubt you were charged a fraud penalty.Note, if this is the first time you've ever paid tax after 4/15, then you may be able to ask for the First Time Abatement of the failure to file/pay penalties, but this is generally done after you've paid or set up a payment plan.Asking for an AUR redetermination is only justified if either the W-2s are NOT to either of you *or* the IRS miscalculated what you owe (which can happen on very complex returns).  If you do decide you need someone to review your tax return, do not hire a tax attorney.  You are not being accused of a crime.  You can hire an Enrolled Agent for a lot less if you want someone with IRS credentials.

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