Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Pregnancy & ParentingToddler & Preschooler · 1 month ago

Is this behaviour normal for a 1 year old ?

I just wanted to check this was normal for her age? I am a first time parent. My daughter is almost 14 months old. She’s been walking 3 weeks and doesn’t not sit down, she is constantly standing. She will just walk around and around. She is an extremely fussy eater so meal times are very hard she will just throw her food and push her hands back and fall on the high chair to get all the food off. She’s hard to get to sleep at night ( getting better now) she just won’t go down. She says dada, muma and nana, some words she will stop saying for a while then will come back to her. She seems to be making more noises now then words. She’s terrible for having her nappy changed it’s like a war everytime! She has recently started tensing her body and pushing her arms out when she’s excited and laughing and it’s hard to explain but push her arms to the back of her with her wrists facing out or her arms in front tensed with her wrists facing in. When she sees people she will give them the biggest smile showing her teeth but then hide into me or behind me if she’s standing up. And she does a group once a week and cries everytime we go there only when we go upstairs and she can pick up on the smell of the church. Once she’s in class she’s fine It’s just that area that has a church smell to it. Is all this normal? No ausitim signs? I’ve just been hearing about it more recently and worried she’s doing odd things.

Update:

I forgot to mention, she can be doing something then stop and get fascinated with her hands or arms. Today she was just walking around with her head looking to the ground like she was upset. 

4 Answers

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  • 4 weeks ago

    This is completely normal behavior for a child this age but as for mealtimes, well you may have to set her mealtimes much later because she's probably not hungry at the times you've been feeding her. If that's not the case though, try taking the food and throw it away. Don't give her a reaction when you do this though because she's most likely just throwing her food because she wants to see how you'll react after it's done. I read an article online about how to get a toddler to stop throwing food and it gives really good advice.

  • 1 month ago

    She's not fussy, she's spoiled. Never allow a child to be a picky eater. They either eat what you serve them or they have to go hungry. Catering or rewarding a picky eater causes eating disorders. Not being allowed to eat anything but what they are served and not getting anything until next meal time unless they eat won't hurt them at all

    A lot of kids don't like having tier nappy changed, do it any way and let her fuss about it 

    In other words she's a NORMAL chidl that is being spoiled and she has a parent who is looking for something that is not there 

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I have an autistic three year old and a typical two year old.

    Every parent of an autistic toddler that I know had MAJOR sleep issues with their kid. My autistic son also moves constantly. He just doesn't stop. He smiles and laughs and has great eye contact, though ...always has. He had an above average vocabulary when he was younger, but he said words at odd times and didn't always make sense.

    Both of my kids when through a stage where they fought diaper changes. Try the floor if you're still using a table. Both can be fussy in groups, and both can be picky eaters. My autistic  son used to go to Gymboree and he liked playing in a group. He never really followed along with the social activities very much, though. He just did his own thing.

    Edit: My autistic son is fine with vacuums and fireworks. He loves to vacuum, himself ...and he yells "Pow!" when he hears firecrackers. My typical daughter is more easily frightened. They both hate public bathrooms with tile walls and they're both afraid of bouncy castles.

  • 1 month ago

    The walking around a lot is normal but the meal times aren't because you let her get away with it.

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